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The Dord the Diglot and an Avocado or Two The Hidden Lives and Strange Origins of Common and Not So Common Words

free read The Dord the Diglot and an Avocado or Two The Hidden Lives and Strange Origins of Common and Not So Common Words

S behind than 300 words names and terms For any devoted philomath a lover of learnin. I'm a self confessed word nerd and I often check the dictionary for where a word came from when it intrigues me This book takes you on a journey with many words and their origins Each word and chapter is in short pieces so this will make a perfect toilet read travel read or a read when you have a short attention span or are between booksWords are sure interestingMany of the words that came to English from French are oddly enough similar in Italian Bain de Marie bagnomaria etc The ways the words have evolved is fascinating sometimes the words have a completely opposite meaning a century after Some words have a misspelling now as their standard form because they were so commonly misspelled so perhaps a future dictionary with have words like your covering you're definitaly and other common misspellings The history of written English isn't that long either; when Shakespeare wrote his works it was phonetic English So everything could have many ways to spell it including how Shakespeare wrote his own name The standardized spelling of English is younger than Gutenberg Wild huh Yet many words have so ancient origins from proto European or eu European linguistic ancestor so now the words even in Swedish and Hindi share the same originsDord is one of my favorite words now because of it's history even if it's been removed from the dictionary a long ago Diglot Is the same as bilingual but formed from different root words So many interesting words

review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Ø Anu Garg

G this anthology of entertaining etymology is an ideal way to have fun with language. The Word a Day eMail and newsletter are welcome deliveries into my inbox The two previous Word a Day books are already on my bookshelf and when I heard about this one I had to have it as wellThis book is a delightful collection of some of the lives and origins of words Why I wonder is the word ‘prepone’ in everyday use in India but not elsewhere Most of us have had meetings either preponed or postponed but few of us used preponed instead of ‘brought forward’My personal favourite word in this collection today anyway is ‘resistentialism’ This is the theory that inanimate objects demonstrate hostile behaviour towards us A theory No I think it is irrefutably true As I browse through the book I see some old favourites such as ‘oleaginous’ If I was a musician I would undoubtedly be aware that a hemidemisemiuaver describes an eighth of a uaverThere are some neat little puzzles in the book as well What is the only state in the USA that has the whole USA in itIf you enjoy the wonderful world of words you may wish to make space for this book on your bookshelf Confessions of a Slacker Wife use in India but not elsewhere Most of Deep Listening: A Composer's Sound Practice us have had meetings either preponed or postponed but few of The New Bohemians: Cool and Collected Homes us Price of Privilege used preponed instead of ‘brought forward’My personal favourite word in this collection today anyway is ‘resistentialism’ This is the theory that inanimate objects demonstrate hostile behaviour towards The Apprentice us A theory No I think it is irrefutably true As I browse through the book I see some old favourites such as ‘oleaginous’ If I was a musician I would Pius XII en de vernietiging van de Joden undoubtedly be aware that a hemidemisemiuaver describes an eighth of a Looking for Lost Bird: A Jewish Woman Discovers Her Navajo Roots uaverThere are some neat little puzzles in the book as well What is the only state in the USA that has the whole USA in itIf you enjoy the wonderful world of words you may wish to make space for this book on your bookshelf

Anu Garg Ø 6 summary

This collection features some of the most interesting stories and fascinating origin. Liked this little book lots Filled with trivia strange words and their history I don't think I'll forget that in English 40 ist the only number that has all its letters in alphabetical order Am I going to check it No wayMy favourite wordsdord the proof that editors do miss the mark sometimes gamp a big umbrellamogigraphia writer's cramp Used to have that often when in university I tried to keep up in writing with the professor's speech thank you ma'am a bump or depression in roadand gadzookery use of archaic words or expressionsThese are not all that surprized me made me smile or even laugh out loud They are just a handful that stood out MacArthur: America's General (The Generals Series) umbrellamogigraphia writer's cramp Used to have that often when in Es war einmal ein Mord university I tried to keep Bruder Kemal up in writing with the professor's speech thank you ma'am a bump or depression in roadand gadzookery Řídících Márinka (Řídících Márinka, use of archaic words or expressionsThese are not all that surprized me made me smile or even laugh out loud They are just a handful that stood out


10 thoughts on “The Dord the Diglot and an Avocado or Two The Hidden Lives and Strange Origins of Common and Not So Common Words

  1. says:

    Fun book about unusual words What do Miss Manners Elmo and baseball player Rickey Henderson have in common? They are illeists people who refer to themselves in the third person Henderson left this message on his manager's voicemail Kevin this is Rickey calling on behalf of Rickey In contrast using the royal we or the editorial we is nosismAn incompetent critic is a criticasterA bilingual person is a diglotHaving a sensitivity for what is correct language is sprachgefuhlAffected use of archaic language is godwotteryAnd a millihelen is a facetious unit of measurement the amount of beauty needed to launch one ship


  2. says:

    uick nerdy just like I like 'em I could have read another whole book's worth of Garg's tidbits on Sanskrit roots That stuff thrills my dork centers


  3. says:

    Liked this little book lots Filled with trivia strange words and their history I don't think I'll forget that in English 40 ist the only number that has all its letters in alphabetical order Am I going to check it? No wayMy favourite wordsdord the proof that editors do miss the mark sometimes gamp a big umbrellamogigraphia writer's cramp Used to have that often when in university I tried to keep up in writing with the professor's speech thank you ma'am a bump or depression in roadand gadzookery use of archaic words or expressionsThese are not all that surprized me made me smile or even laugh out loud They are just a handful that stood out


  4. says:

    This amusing little book groups its word histories into themes eponyms toponyms charactonyms with a whole chapter just for Dickens words about food words deliberately coined This is a better method than alphabetical or by conversational happenstanceGarg's origin of hazard derives from an Arabic word for die singular of dice sounds plausible; of glamor salary travel and window I knew so they continued to sound plausible but his history of curfew I will have to double check elsewhere from French couvrir and feu a call through town to cover or bank or otherwise subdue your fire so you wouldn't torch the place through carelessness Chortle gerrymander and grok are old hat but I didn't know scofflaw was similarly deliberately coined during Prohibition and meaning someone who flouts the 18th amendmentI am delighted that clerihew was the name of someone who invented that form of comic verse the word sounds so wordish in contrast to the obvious name iness of boycott that I would never have guessed What's most interesting about that eponym is that it was the fellow's middle name Petrichor dates only to 1964 but it's so perfect and Greek that I assumed it was as old as spartan or laconic Garg credits a pair of Australians with it and good the smell after a rain is often delicious but those from an arid climate appreciate it the mostI learned two words whose meanings I will find useful accismus and velleity The former means to feign lack of interest in something while actually desiring it as with Aesop's fox with the grapes; the latter is volition at its weakest and Garg applies it to doing your taxesSo I liked Garg's organizational method but it didn't spare me his conversation I allowed him to pun occasionally and allowed how 'Turinto ruin' didn't sound forced But after explaining laconic from Laconia he wonders how they found their talk show hosts What a witticism In the very next section logically enough about Sparta he credits Sparta's spartanness on its lack of a television shopping channel Gah In the next a pun using both a homograph and a homophone Then he lays off for a whileEvery few pages is a wordish trivia uestion Some were good What is the only state whose name and capital share no letters? What is the only English word with three apostrophes? South Dakota and Pierre fo'c's'le Some were chestnuts What words begins and ends with 'und'? Does any word have three double letters? underground and bookkeeper But some were outright stupid What word becomes shorter when you add two letters to it? What abbreviation has syllables than the full form? shorter and WWWThen there was nark Garg asserts that nark and pince nez each derive from the Indo European root nas meaning nose This I did not buy Narc meaning stool pigeon is a clipping of narcotics agent isn't it? But my snark was ill founded because there is a British English word nark distinct from Usan narc Merriam Webster isn't as certain of its etymology as Garg is but I had to smooth out my sneer and that I did not like Oh well I can still complain about the forcedly jocular tone


  5. says:

    I am normally all about dictionaries of obscure words Sometimes I think it's best to skip the poetry or prose altogether and sink teeth right into the juicy stuff the stories of words before we start meddling by crafting our own stories with them Or perhaps it's that the best writing reveals all the facets and history of words we normally forget and does so in an emotionally compelling wayEither way Garg's book doesn't make good on its promise Over the course of almost two hundred pages I learned at most three useful words; everything else was either already in common enough usage that this loser employs them on the daily and have Latin roots obvious enough you could probably make a guess good enough for a GRE problem or far often words that were actually obscure enough that they can't be used in contemporary conversation or writing Not even interesting words that get at something specific that others lack just long or Latinate words one would use to prove one could use them Those people are Sesuipedalians by the way and very much deserve their own termMost irritating I think are Garg's self satisfied introductions to chapters in which he builds up the mystery of the English language and prepares for a big reveal which never comes This is probably a lesson I should take to heart myself that relishing the words should be apparent in their usage which will speak for itself and not rhapsodized over at great lengths Because nobody cares really we just want the thought or in this case the words


  6. says:

    I'm a self confessed word nerd and I often check the dictionary for where a word came from when it intrigues me This book takes you on a journey with many words and their origins Each word and chapter is in short pieces so this will make a perfect toilet read travel read or a read when you have a short attention span or are between booksWords are sure interestingMany of the words that came to English from French are oddly enough similar in Italian Bain de Marie bagnomaria etc The ways the words have evolved is fascinating sometimes the words have a completely opposite meaning a century after Some words have a misspelling now as their standard form because they were so commonly misspelled so perhaps a future dictionary with have words like your covering you're definitaly and other common misspellings The history of written English isn't that long either; when Shakespeare wrote his works it was phonetic English So everything could have many ways to spell it including how Shakespeare wrote his own name The standardized spelling of English is younger than Gutenberg Wild huh? Yet many words have so ancient origins from proto European or eu European linguistic ancestor so now the words even in Swedish and Hindi share the same originsDord is one of my favorite words now because of it's history even if it's been removed from the dictionary a long ago Diglot Is the same as bilingual but formed from different root words So many interesting words


  7. says:

    Want to know what the word “easel” and a Dutch donkey have in common? Or what to call the sweet smell after the first spring rain? Or why if you tell a Frenchman you’re “blessed” he’ll probably run for some gauze? Then this is the book for you my word nerd friends Written by the creator of the AWordADay e newsletter this gleeful guide to all things etymological explores the “hidden lives” and “strange origins” of seemingly ordinary and not so seemingly ordinary words Thankfully the book’s author keeps all that information which could easily become as musty and dusty as an old book binding fun and fresh by maintaining an upbeat tone and peppering his text with 77 uestions of wordplay and trivia He also divides his information into themed chapters with cutesy headings such as • Dickensian Characters Who Became Words• Streets That Became Metaphors• Words to Describe People Insults• It’s All a Myth• Lexicographer There Is a Fly in My LanguageThe end result? An etymology book that’s actually entertaining or at least as entertaining as an etymology book can ever be All in all a pretty fun read Who the hell is still doing e newsletters? Seriously


  8. says:

    This book would have been better if it weren't for a few annoying things First the author kept making stupid jokes that weren't funny; maybe if I was in conversation with him I'd laugh but his humor didn't translate to text Second the book was frenetic in its structure; there'd be some etymology then all of a sudden a list of terms then a random aside then back to etymology It was really hard to get into a rhythm when reading it Finally it didn't always teach me etymologies that were useful I assume the book is British which explains some of the manifold terms and idioms I've never heard here in the states but others were archaic terms or ones that only linguists would know the meaning or proper usage of I would have liked to see etymologies for common English words And not what he determined to be common words which had etymologies that the average high schooler knows if not younger people The last chapter which explained how the root ProtoIndoEuropean language gave us so many disparate words that have the same common root was extremely cool There were other random selections scattered throughout that were interesting but not enough to save my opinion of the work as a whole


  9. says:

    The Word a Day eMail and newsletter are welcome deliveries into my inbox The two previous Word a Day books are already on my bookshelf and when I heard about this one I had to have it as wellThis book is a delightful collection of some of the lives and origins of words Why I wonder is the word ‘prepone’ in everyday use in India but not elsewhere? Most of us have had meetings either preponed or postponed but few of us used preponed instead of ‘brought forward’My personal favourite word in this collection today anyway is ‘resistentialism’ This is the theory that inanimate objects demonstrate hostile behaviour towards us A theory? No I think it is irrefutably true As I browse through the book I see some old favourites such as ‘oleaginous’ If I was a musician I would undoubtedly be aware that a hemidemisemiuaver describes an eighth of a uaverThere are some neat little puzzles in the book as well What is the only state in the USA that has the whole USA in it?If you enjoy the wonderful world of words you may wish to make space for this book on your bookshelf


  10. says:

    Brynn and Craig gave me this book for my birthday Props peepsYou've really got to hand it to old Anu Garg a non English speaker he's from India he's authored three best selling English books on the English language Anyone who's ever learned a new language and enjoyed learning it can identify with Anu's enthusiasm and joy in re all aspects of English his new language This latest book Dord Diglot and Avocado continues the fun If nothing else reading the book should get you to subscribe to Anu's website and daily email word prompt wwwwordsmithorg Anu is something of a paronomasiciac as am I but I try to keep it in check Anu on the other hand just revels in all manner of punning anagramming ambigramming etc eg the phrase my name is anu garg anagrammatizes as anagram genius Somehow though he never seems to cross the line into full blown obnoxious I can only admire that kind of euipoiseThe bonus of the book for me is that I learned a new adjective to apply to myself diglot I am a diglot and proud of it too