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Clyde Fans Book 1

Review Clyde Fans Book 1

Just along King Street at number 159 you will find the old storefront of the Clyde Fans Company It's been locked up for years now and most people would naturally assume that it's completely abandoned Look closer Peer in through the display window into the dimly lit office and ther. On the one hand I'm excited that Seth made a book about a couple of brothers who sell electric fans in the 1950's But on the other hand I'm not that excited to read a book about a couple of brothers who sell electric fans in the 1950's Chris Ware and Seth are neck and neck when it comes to drawing silent towns but I found the first half of this book to be a real snooze It's a 50 page present day solilouy that can be summarized with My brother the electric fan salesman Not good Once we get to the flashback second half of the book the story and drawings are old timey pop fun that reminded me of Glengary Glen Ross with only Alec Baldwin's and Jack Lemmon's character But jeez Seth That never ending first half was a real clunker You were killing me and the people on the plane who pretended not to read over my shoulder

Review Ï PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ☆ Seth

E on the far wall you will just be able to make out the black and white photographs of a pair of rather grim looking businessmen Abraham and Simon MatchcardIf you were to go in further back through that battered safety door and into the living and work spaces of the old building y. Clyde Fans Book 1 is the first part of Seth's masterpiece It follows the fortunes of the two Matchcard brothers in the fan business The book is divided into two parts with the first part set in the present following the Clyde Fans business with the confident brother Abraham Matchcard talking to the reader about the business how it started how it fared his life now and his relationship with his brother The second part is set in the past with Simon Matchcard the shy brother trying to become successful as a fan salesman like his brother and how he fares along the way Simon's lack of experience shows and he doesn't sell any fans and hides out in a hotel This second part is almost entirely wordless compared to the first part with masses of dialogue from Abraham The ending leaves the reader wanting to see what Simon does as he ends up at night on an empty Crazy Golf course I don't really want to criticise Seth as I adore his work It's a Good Life If You Don't Weaken is brilliant and Wimbledon Green is a comic masterwork Vernacular Drawings is a gorgeously produced book of the artist's paintings and I can't wait to read George Sprott which is on order Clyde Fans though is a bit so so Abraham's story is a bit mundane and follows the usual Seth gripe of things were better in the past even though I know they probably weren't and so we get anecdotes about how business was good and how technology has moved on and left small businesses in the dust real John Steinbeck type stuff But the artwork is as wonderful as always especially in Simon's story where there are haunting images perhaps indicative of Simon's state of mind of ordinary landscapes given surreal beauty by Seth's hand I guess I'm saying I liked it but it wasn't a gripping read It is the first part mind and so sets up the story for the next part but as for it being Seth's supposed masterpiece well I'm hoping Part 2 picks up the pace a bit

Seth ☆ 2 Summary

Ou would pass into the hidden world that has sustained these lonely brothers for than five decadesIn this the first of two books you will meet the Matchcard brothers and follow them through their journeys of disappointments loss and isolations Two salesmen who have failed to close. I didn't expect to enjoy this as much as I did I'm not sure why Maybe coming down from finishing Lev Grossman's excellent The Magician's Land I was in the mood for something whimsical and fantastic; in contrast Clyde Fans is a look at the seemingly dreary lives of a couple of fan salesmen brothers Abe and Simon from the '50s up to the late '90sSeth's art is an instant draw however His line work is bold and solid and the images he chooses to present in telling this story are striking and haunting I'm thinking particularly of late scenes showing the train and Simon's break and enter into the abandoned golf course Seth really knows how to tell a visual story and a simple silent panel with debris blowing down a city street is enough to send shivers down my spineAs well the opening narration seems at first to be an interview with Abe who reflects on his and his reclusive brother's lives but as we follow Abe from room to room including the bathroom it begins to appear as if Abe is ruminating on the past to no one in particular and maybe just himself Seth uses panels to present the opening chapter in a documentary style but subverts that style as we are shown and personal moments and spaces in Abe's environmentBut the art isn't all this story has going for it Seth's character work is superb and Simon is especially well developed Part of me wonders after having watched several interviews with the eccentric Seth if the character is somewhat autobiographical They are certainly similar in appearance but Simon could be as much as thirty years older than Seth That said this discrepancy would still make sense considering Seth's penchant for the past and disdain for certain cultural trends of the presentThe main topic of this graphic novel is sales at least on the surface and the characters struggle or succeed based on their ability to make a sale and understand the process In this regard Abe is the success story and Simon is the failure At the end of Book One however the reader is left with a sinking feeling that Simon is not solely at fault in this failure but that consumerism ever present in the past as it is now and Simon's participation in it stokes and inflames his social anxietyBook Two will hopefully expand on these ideas but either way I'm looking forward to diving back into this black and white world and all the beautiful doldrums therein Chicken visual story and a simple silent panel with debris blowing down a city street is enough to send shivers down my spineAs well the opening narration seems at first to be an interview with Abe who reflects on his and his reclusive brother's lives but as we follow Abe from room to room including the bathroom it begins to appear as if Abe is ruminating on the past to no one in particular and maybe just himself Seth uses panels to present the opening chapter in a documentary style but subverts that style as we are shown and personal moments and spaces in Abe's environmentBut the art isn't all this story has going for it Seth's character work is superb and Simon is especially well developed Part of me wonders after having watched several interviews with the eccentric Seth if the character is somewhat autobiographical They are certainly similar in appearance but Simon could be as much as thirty years older than Seth That said this discrepancy would still make sense considering Seth's penchant for the past and disdain for certain cultural trends of the presentThe main topic of this graphic novel is sales at least on the surface and the characters struggle or succeed based on their ability to make a sale and understand the process In this regard Abe is the success story and Simon is the failure At the end of Book One however the reader is left with a sinking feeling that Simon is not solely at fault in this failure but that consumerism ever present in the past as it is now and Simon's participation in it stokes and inflames his social anxietyBook Two will hopefully expand on these ideas but either way I'm looking forward to diving back into this black and white world and all the beautiful doldrums therein


10 thoughts on “Clyde Fans Book 1

  1. says:

    I love Seth's work and this work is similar to others he has done or is doing He's nostalgic passionate about the past and the importance of preserving history and comicart history The tone and color of his work is subdued a throwback to comic greats and we can almost feel how much he wishes he lived 60 80 years in the past And he cares about every day people people mostly older guys with largely unremarkable stories This is the story of two brothers one of whom Abraham inherited and took the reins of a company Clyde Fans and made it work modestly for decades a pretty unremarkable guy telling of his past work sort of boringly but also charmingly really into the details of sales and the business Who cares about this story of a small town businessman? But I found I did care about the guy and even in part II his brother Simon who speaks less but we go deeper into his story about his repulsion from businesscommercesalesmanship and this second half is admittedly far engaging because of all the angst Abe's anti biz bro has We reader types mostly like arty angsty characters not businessmen who like Abe can be boring but here we are delving into the world has he sees it and as it turns out it is charmingAll this is told through beautiful golden ages style drawing consistent with the period he wants to capture and uirky art too in a way perfect for a character study of two brothers who are both odd a little off putting and still for me interesting as representatives of a past long ago This is a kind of narrative trick Seth engages in; how do you make normal every day folks interesting ones who are reclusive and typically uncommunicative? Yet most people are like them I might argue and why should literature only be about Macbeth or Gatsby? I like those kind of dramatic stories but I also like these fictional slice of life stories too which he imbues with meaning and depth He cares about these people The second brother Simon cares about cheesy old fashioned postcards collecting them cataloguing them than business or sales; in this sense he stands in for Seth and actually looks uite a bit like him as one who likes and wants to preserve uirky outsider art I like this guy Seth a lot who is in a class with his mentor and friend Chris Ware who writes in his work about similar people This book was published in 2009 Book 2 is still not out but is close to being released and I will read it without uestion


  2. says:

    On the one hand I'm excited that Seth made a book about a couple of brothers who sell electric fans in the 1950's But on the other hand I'm not that excited to read a book about a couple of brothers who sell electric fans in the 1950's Chris Ware and Seth are neck and neck when it comes to drawing silent towns but I found the first half of this book to be a real snooze It's a 50 page present day solilouy that can be summarized with My brother the electric fan salesman Not good Once we get to the flashback second half of the book the story and drawings are old timey pop fun that reminded me of Glengary Glen Ross with only Alec Baldwin's and Jack Lemmon's character But jeez Seth That never ending first half was a real clunker You were killing me and the people on the plane who pretended not to read over my shoulder


  3. says:

    A fascinating yet subdued character studyor studies Reread as well as reread issues #16 20 of Palookaville before turning to Seth's new volume of Palookaville1082017 Once again rereading this and entire Clyde Fans installments as refresher and to prepare for final chapter in latest Palookaville


  4. says:

    Clyde Fans Book 1 is the first part of Seth's masterpiece It follows the fortunes of the two Matchcard brothers in the fan business The book is divided into two parts with the first part set in the present following the Clyde Fans business with the confident brother Abraham Matchcard talking to the reader about the business how it started how it fared his life now and his relationship with his brother The second part is set in the past with Simon Matchcard the shy brother trying to become successful as a fan salesman like his brother and how he fares along the way Simon's lack of experience shows and he doesn't sell any fans and hides out in a hotel This second part is almost entirely wordless compared to the first part with masses of dialogue from Abraham The ending leaves the reader wanting to see what Simon does as he ends up at night on an empty Crazy Golf course I don't really want to criticise Seth as I adore his work It's a Good Life If You Don't Weaken is brilliant and Wimbledon Green is a comic masterwork Vernacular Drawings is a gorgeously produced book of the artist's paintings and I can't wait to read George Sprott which is on order Clyde Fans though is a bit so so Abraham's story is a bit mundane and follows the usual Seth gripe of things were better in the past even though I know they probably weren't and so we get anecdotes about how business was good and how technology has moved on and left small businesses in the dust real John Steinbeck type stuff But the artwork is as wonderful as always especially in Simon's story where there are haunting images perhaps indicative of Simon's state of mind of ordinary landscapes given surreal beauty by Seth's hand I guess I'm saying I liked it but it wasn't a gripping read It is the first part mind and so sets up the story for the next part but as for it being Seth's supposed masterpiece well I'm hoping Part 2 picks up the pace a bit


  5. says:

    Like some others here I thought the second part much engaging than the first part the former being primarily a solilouy with not a whole lot in the way of drama to propel it Love these characters cynical Abe and poor hapless fish out of water Simon and the detailed drawings Interesting how Seth uses shadows especially on faces ranging from grey to black Sometimes the shadows are so dark the character's head can be partly or even completely engulfed in black as if wearing a mask or a black hood I'm definitely interested to see of Seth's works I liked to watch the real salesmen the old time travelers A lot could be learned from those guys Those fellas had plenty of charm They used to say that sincerity sells and if you can fake that you've got it made Ha Gotta love that


  6. says:

    Oh Seth you are so frustrating Sometimes your art and storytelling ability are fantastic Undoubtedly you were and are a trailblazer of the graphic literature form an auteur cartoonist with a uniue narrative and visual styles and themes But occasionally your work fails Not that I'm excited to be a God killer particularly since we share a hometown but someone needs to say the emperor has no clothesI applaud Seth experimenting with the medium Experimentation is necessary not only for great art but to keep a medium vital But despite best intentions and the greatness of past work not all experiments succeedCase in point the first part of this book is a solilouy and given directly to the reader presumably Such solilouies are a conceit made famous by Shakespeare that is not without problems ie it is unrealistic and takes the reader out of the fantasy that's why Brecht did it It can also be tedious as with only one speaker there is often no drama Direct address solilouies don’t generally work in other mediums At least with theatre there is a direct physical relationship a co presence between performer and viewer With a book the distance is too vast between character and reader so it never stops feeling weird that one character is going on and on for MANY PAGES to an invisible someone It doesn't help that it is a great big spiel about the nature of sales back in the old days not particularly interesting for than a handful of pagesLingering on one character and one location is inherently problematic as the lack of change creates monotony Seth knew that a solilouy would be visually deadly so he has the character move in and out of rooms eat bath etc all why never having the character break his outward gaze and speech to his invisible audience The character goes inside and outside and into seemingly countless different rooms to the point that it gets ridiculous as to the why and where are all these places Despite the changing location the character is also often in the same position within the frame so the composition of the panels gets very visually monotonous The various narrative and visual techniues used in the first half add up to poor use of the medium and uncompelling storytelling This story might work in other mediums but it inherently is a poor use of this medium Thankfully the second half is much stronger as it has various scenarios characters locations and hints of an ultimate mysterious possibly tragic end I have to say that I am stunned by the reviewers who have unfettered praise for this work If this same work was released with someone else’s name as creator which wouldn’t work as the visual style is distinctly Seth and a main character looks like him I’m certain it wouldn’t earn the praise The flaws in the use of medium are apparent and lethally dull


  7. says:

    I didn't expect to enjoy this as much as I did I'm not sure why Maybe coming down from finishing Lev Grossman's excellent The Magician's Land I was in the mood for something whimsical and fantastic; in contrast Clyde Fans is a look at the seemingly dreary lives of a couple of fan salesmen brothers Abe and Simon from the '50s up to the late '90sSeth's art is an instant draw however His line work is bold and solid and the images he chooses to present in telling this story are striking and haunting I'm thinking particularly of late scenes showing the train and Simon's break and enter into the abandoned golf course Seth really knows how to tell a visual story and a simple silent panel with debris blowing down a city street is enough to send shivers down my spineAs well the opening narration seems at first to be an interview with Abe who reflects on his and his reclusive brother's lives but as we follow Abe from room to room including the bathroom it begins to appear as if Abe is ruminating on the past to no one in particular and maybe just himself Seth uses panels to present the opening chapter in a documentary style but subverts that style as we are shown and personal moments and spaces in Abe's environmentBut the art isn't all this story has going for it Seth's character work is superb and Simon is especially well developed Part of me wonders after having watched several interviews with the eccentric Seth if the character is somewhat autobiographical They are certainly similar in appearance but Simon could be as much as thirty years older than Seth That said this discrepancy would still make sense considering Seth's penchant for the past and disdain for certain cultural trends of the presentThe main topic of this graphic novel is sales at least on the surface and the characters struggle or succeed based on their ability to make a sale and understand the process In this regard Abe is the success story and Simon is the failure At the end of Book One however the reader is left with a sinking feeling that Simon is not solely at fault in this failure but that consumerism ever present in the past as it is now and Simon's participation in it stokes and inflames his social anxietyBook Two will hopefully expand on these ideas but either way I'm looking forward to diving back into this black and white world and all the beautiful doldrums therein


  8. says:

    First part was a bit long and tedious but Simon's part of the story brought my rating up to a 4 There is definitely an interesting dichotomy between the narrative; I assume Abe being the successful salesperson has always been somewhat of a talker and his segment is all explained through his wordy monologue while walking about doing his day to day whereas Simon's is through the art and his nervous flashbacks and expressions Yes there is dialogue in part 2 but it functions almost as background Pretty great usage of the comic format Simon's also dressed as Seth would and how he's been drawn in other works with the suit and hat and glasses so I wonder how much of the character is drawn from his own personality


  9. says:

    I probably would've rated this higher if it were a complete book instead of only half a story And if I'd known my library only has this Part 1 I wouldn't even have bothered reading about Abe Matchcard retired Canadian salesman of the family fan business and brother Simon's ill fated attempt in the field Somehow this reads like a mystery so I found myself searching through the pictures which are excellent btw for clues without knowing what for


  10. says:

    the story in this graphic novel seems so mundane 2 guys selling fans in the 50's But I was totally enthralled I'm anxiously awaiting the publication of part 2 where I doubt anything will happen Still it reminds me of playing in grandma rosses old wood storage area musty and otherworldly light its like a dream where the ordinary is somehow inexplicably extra ordinary