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The Great God Pan

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On publication it was widely denounced by the press as degenerate and horrific because of its decadent style and sexual content although it has since garnered a reputation as a classic of horror Machen’s story was only one of many at the. Read for ClassI'm glad I had to re read this for the final because it's definitely not a 2 star read like my previous rating

Characters Ì PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ✓ Arthur Machen

Time to focus on Pan as a useful symbol for the power of nature and paganism The title was taken from the poem A Musical Instrument published in 1862 by Elizabeth Barrett Browning in which the first line of every stanza ends the great god P. For Reasons a guy named Raymond wants to experiment on putting a person into some sort of altered state Mary was like super poor and he took her in and fed her so this is fair he says She agrees because of Stockholm syndrome like loyalty to this creep Bad idea genes abound here and then Mary and Raymond are basically out of the narrativeAgain with a really destitute person in the street Herbert an old school chum of Villiers No you're not supposed to know who Villiers is Does he try to help his unfortunate friend No he just listens to his sad but vague story about his unfortunate marriage and how it ruined his life then says 'bye and goes off and tells other people because he appears to be a nosy gossip and judgy too Machen is by no means a great prose stylist and this book is written in a confused manner Many lurid events are hinted at then broken off with a leaving the reader to surmise what took place It would be fine if the conclusions were obvious but they aren't even when I thought I got what had happened and I found myself several time turning back trying to figure out if a person had died or whatInteresting that Machen named the insignificant artist character Meyrink as the tone of the book is uite reminiscent of Eggeler's illustrations for Meyrink the writerI'm not sure what mythological or anthropological material this is based on if any It doesn't jive with the admittedly minimal material I've read on PanI have a reprint of the 1926 Ayer Company publication that includes Inmost Light and Red Hand as well I was relieved to reach page 90 and find out I was done with this story MacArthur: America's General (The Generals Series) useful symbol for the power of nature and paganism The title was taken from the poem A Musical Instrument published in 1862 by Elizabeth Barrett Browning in which the first line of every stanza ends the great god P. For Reasons a guy named Raymond wants to experiment on putting a person into some sort of altered state Mary was like super poor and he took her in and fed her so this is fair he says She agrees because of Stockholm syndrome like loyalty to this creep Bad idea genes abound here and then Mary and Raymond are basically out of the narrativeAgain with a really destitute person in the street Herbert an old school chum of Villiers No you're not supposed to know who Villiers is Does he try to help his Es war einmal ein Mord unfortunate friend No he just listens to his sad but vague story about his Bruder Kemal unfortunate marriage and how it ruined his life then says 'bye and goes off and tells other people because he appears to be a nosy gossip and judgy too Machen is by no means a great prose stylist and this book is written in a confused manner Many lurid events are hinted at then broken off with a leaving the reader to surmise what took place It would be fine if the conclusions were obvious but they aren't even when I thought I got what had happened and I found myself several time turning back trying to figure out if a person had died or whatInteresting that Machen named the insignificant artist character Meyrink as the tone of the book is Řídících Márinka (Řídících Márinka, uite reminiscent of Eggeler's illustrations for Meyrink the writerI'm not sure what mythological or anthropological material this is based on if any It doesn't jive with the admittedly minimal material I've read on PanI have a reprint of the 1926 Ayer Company publication that includes Inmost Light and Red Hand as well I was relieved to reach page 90 and find out I was done with this story

Arthur Machen ✓ 6 Summary

The Great God Pan is a novella written by Arthur Machen A version of the story was published in the magazine Whirlwind in 1890 and Machen revised and extended it for its book publication together with another story The Inmost Light in 1894. Whatever the hell was going on with the society when this was published This a sensation Underwhelming Thank God I live now not then I would have died bored out of my mindToo whimsical for me Reads like a cross of Hawthorne with Poe with just a tad of Lovecraft who might have been a diligent follower of Machen at a later date and several notes from Merezhkovsky of all autors added into the mix Though in the case of Merezhkovsky it is not clear who influenced who even if this was not a case of ideas congeniality since they sort of worked and published simultaneously Lovecraft might have been himself influenced by Machen not the other way around The story centers around a hypomaniacal sociopathic butcher of a transcendent surgeon who spews lots of bullshit and proceeds to act on it Some Pan added to the mix some dreadful mysteries some incarnates some whatnot Did nothing to me read tediously Why did I even bother to read it“No I think not even if the worst happened As you know I rescued Mary fromthe gutter and from almost certain starvation when she was a child; I think her life ismine to use as I see fit” cBut have you no misgivings Raymond Is it absolutely safe”“Safe Of course it is In itself the operation is a perfectly simple one; any surgeoncould do it”“And there is no danger at any other stage”“None; absolutely no physical danger whatsoever I give you my word “We are standing on the brink of a strange world Raymond if what you say is true I suppose the knife is absolutely necessary”c This is patently what should be the prompt to getting the hell out of the plan whatever it involves operations investments whatever Hear the crock talking And not the feeble 'is the knife necessary'That is a strange saying of his ‘In every grain of wheat there lies hidden the soul of a star’“ cStrangely that wonderful hot day of the fifties rose up again in Clarke’s imagination; the sense of dazzling all pervading sunlight seemed to blot out the shadows and the lights of the laboratory and he felt again the heated air beating in gusts about his face saw the shimmer rising from the turf and heard the myriad murmur of the summer cHe could only think of the lonely walk he had taken fifteen years ago; it was his last look at the fields and woods he had known since he was a child and now it all stood out in brilliant light as a picture before him Above all there came to his nostrils the scent of summer the smell of flowers mingled and the odour of the woods of cool shaded places deep in the green depths drawn forth by the sun’s heat; and the scent of the good earth lying as it were with arms stretched forth and smiling lips overpowered all His fancies made him wander as he had wandered long ago from the fields into the wood tracking a little path between the shining undergrowth of beech trees; and the trickle of water dropping from the limestone rock sounded as a clear melody in the dream c