The Sanitary City Environmental Services in Urban America from Colonial Times to the Present Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ characters ¼ 104


5 thoughts on “The Sanitary City Environmental Services in Urban America from Colonial Times to the Present Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ

  1. says:

    After I finished this book I was surprised to see that it got many good reviews and not a few awards It is after all mainly a sprawling collection of statistics facts and dates with little story or organization An abridged edition however might be worthwhile and one was released recently because this book it does contain truly interesting facts from America's checkered history of water works sewage and garbage disposal These services are called the invisible city for a reason and this book certainly helps make the invisible visibleFor instance I didn't know that European street cleaning basically started in Paris in the 12th century because the King was sick of the dung heaps outside his palace or that the now ubiuitous aerated sewer plants were concocted in a Massachusetts state sanitary lab in 1912 or that the famed Memphis separated sewer system was pretty much a bust in its earlier years and reuired millions in upgradesSure most of these facts or stories could only warm the heart of a dedicated public works nerd but I'm glad I have them collected in this book I only wish someone could make something better out of them


  2. says:

    I like this book I think Melosi does a great job chronicling how sanitary services were developed in the United States moving from private hands to public works What follows is a summary of its highlights that are delivered in the full textDelivering services infrastructure is the primary function of municipal government “I have chosen sanitary or environmental services—water supply sewerage and solid waste disposal—because they have been and remain indispensable for the functioning and growth of cities” Water and waste disposal as global dictators 1 Comprehensive history of water supply wastewater and solid waste disposal systems in American cities from colonial times to the year 2000 Development assessment of their influence on urban growth and evaluation of their impact on the environment National perspective rather than case studies The long timeline allows for “a thorough examination of changes among other things in technology in the evolution of regulatory authority and in patterns of urban growth” 2Chronothematic organization change over time but also —the influence of public health and ecological theory on implementation of sanitary services; the role of key decision makers sanitarians engineers physicians and political leaders in selecting what services to provide and how to; and the environmental implications of those choices CONTEMPORARY PERIODICALS GOVT REPORTS CITY PUBLICATIONS PROCEEDINGS OF SEVERAL ENGINEERING AND PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATIONS Social sciences ecological theory systems theory and path dependence theory 2City as human body—metaphor Flaws but it also had its uses Systems not just networks Path dependence theory—long term impact of technologies of sanitation 1 to want degree did the uest for permanence produce technologies of sanitation resistant to change? 2 did the early focus on project design limit attention to long range planning of the systems? 12Part I The Age of Miasmas From Colonial Times to 1880Cities faced poor sanitary conditions and suffered the crippling effects of epidemic diseases with only a vague understanding of their cause 12a few larger cities developed community wide water supply systems with rudimentary distribution networks but continued to regard waste disposal as an individual responsibility The powerful worldwide influence of the the English “sanitary idea” in mid 19th c linked filth with disease sparked interest in sanitation systems for community waste disposal 12miasmas—filth or foul smells—were blamed for epidemicskeep wastes from accumulating in city centersPart II The Bacteriological Revolution 1880 1945development of modern sanitary services 1880 1920—dynamic urban growth in US Biological revolution of late 19th c good impetus inoculation and immunization Interwar years saw solid waste disposal and better services in suburban and rural gradual catch up to urban services 13Part III The New Ecology 1945 2000External forces were central to influencing sanitary services after WWII Urban sprawl and decay of urban core—permanence of sanitary systems—presented challenges Added to biological forms of pollution were chemicalindustrial pollutants The emergence of New Ecology and the modern environmental movement caused a reevaluation of sanitary systems So too with the “garbage crisis” on the horizon—solid waste and landfills and tougher environmental legislation 14EPILOGUE The environmental paradigm shift from miasmas to bacteria did not radically disrupt or change the old system of collection—which were generally successful in distancing humans from their wastes and discards In fact the “front of pipe” components in these technologies remained largely the same while it did inform some innovations in confronting “end of pipe” problems— ie water treatment and refining did not call into uestion the basic precept of permanent citywide sanitary systems 424 Because waste and water systems were built to be permanent rather than resilient future generations could not easily choose to abandon these systems but instead had to maintain and expand them Though built with permanence in mind to justify initial costs to their community the lack of flexibility came at a cost to future decision makers Runoff and non point pollution were not anticipated from the initial designs of these systems and are thus difficult late 20th century pollutant problems “Modular flexibility” is the goal of new designs of infrastructure “To function effectively the American city has to be a sanitary city”426


  3. says:

    What is the author's point? His narrative was so dull that it was almost impossible to grasp I had to skim through the second half because even reading throughly didn't make me take anything out it


  4. says:

    The conclusion of the book is that the basic concepts and infrastructure of waste disposal have incrementally evolved over time from miasmas to bacterial contamination to industrial pollution but remain in place The basic assumption is that waste should and can be moved away from human and natural habitat Meanwhile San Francisco is making substantial progress toward a zero waste goal; Seattle seems to be making progress toward reducing stormwater runoff at the source I wonder about the book's core assumption; is it possible to migrate away from the basic concept of awayAlthough the book gets crashingly dull particularly in the coverage of PostWar US as a long litany of changing laws and shifting political administrations it has a lot of good information about the origin and evolution of systems of waste disposal and treatment for those interested in the social history of technologyhttpwwwsfenvironmentorgzero waste


  5. says:

    A magnificent account of how American cities developed systems to free their populations of the dangers of epidemic disease even as the cities grew in size and density This edition is abridged from the 2000 edition omitting many detailed examples yet retaining the ambitious national setting and period It provides an excellent introduction to the history of the urban built environment; if it whets your appetite seek out the unabridged version as well as Joel A Tarr's The Search for the Ultimate Sink


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The Sanitary City Environmental Services in Urban America from Colonial Times to the Present Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ

Download ñ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ✓ Martin V. Melosi

For those interested in environmental history environmental engineering science and technology urban studies and public healthWinner of George Perkins Marsh Prize from the American Society for Environmental History Urban History Association Prize for the best book in North American Urban History Abel Wolman Prize from the Public Works Historical Society Sidney Edelstein Prize from the Society for the History of Technolo. What is the author's point His narrative was so dull that it was almost impossible to grasp I had to skim through the second half because even reading throughly didn't make me take anything out it

Free read The Sanitary City Environmental Services in Urban America from Colonial Times to the Present Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ

Immersed in their on demand highly consumptive and disposable lifestyles most urban Americans take for granted the technologies that provide them with potable water remove their trash and process their wastewater These vital services however are the byproduct of many decades of development by engineers sanitarians and civic planners  In The Sanitary City Martin V Melosi assembles a comprehensive thoroughly researched an. After I finished this book I was surprised to see that it got many good reviews and not a few awards It is after all mainly a sprawling collection of statistics facts and dates with little story or organization An abridged edition however might be worthwhile and one was released recently because this book it does contain truly interesting facts from America's checkered history of water works sewage and garbage disposal These services are called the invisible city for a reason and this book certainly helps make the invisible visibleFor instance I didn't know that European street cleaning basically started in Paris in the 12th century because the King was sick of the dung heaps outside his palace or that the now ubiuitous aerated sewer plants were concocted in a Massachusetts state sanitary lab in 1912 or that the famed Memphis separated sewer system was pretty much a bust in its earlier years and reuired millions in upgradesSure most of these facts or stories could only warm the heart of a dedicated public works nerd but I'm glad I have them collected in this book I only wish someone could make something better out of them

Download ñ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ✓ Martin V. Melosi

D referenced history of sanitary services in urban America He examines the evolution of water supply sewage systems and solid waste disposal during three distinct eras The Age of Miasmas pre 1880; The Bacteriological Revolution 1880 1945; and The New Ecology 1945 to present day  Originally published in 2000 this abridged edition includes updated text and bibliographic materials The Sanitary City is an essential resource. I like this book I think Melosi does a great job chronicling how sanitary services were developed in the United States moving from private hands to public works What follows is a summary of its highlights that are delivered in the full textDelivering services infrastructure is the primary function of municipal government “I have chosen sanitary or environmental services—water supply sewerage and solid waste disposal—because they have been and remain indispensable for the functioning and growth of cities” Water and waste disposal as global dictators 1 Comprehensive history of water supply wastewater and solid waste disposal systems in American cities from colonial times to the year 2000 Development assessment of their influence on urban growth and evaluation of their impact on the environment National perspective rather than case studies The long timeline allows for “a thorough examination of changes among other things in technology in the evolution of regulatory authority and in patterns of urban growth” 2Chronothematic organization change over time but also —the influence of public health and ecological theory on implementation of sanitary services; the role of key decision makers sanitarians engineers physicians and political leaders in selecting what services to provide and how to; and the environmental implications of those choices CONTEMPORARY PERIODICALS GOVT REPORTS CITY PUBLICATIONS PROCEEDINGS OF SEVERAL ENGINEERING AND PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATIONS Social sciences ecological theory systems theory and path dependence theory 2City as human body—metaphor Flaws but it also had its uses Systems not just networks Path dependence theory—long term impact of technologies of sanitation 1 to want degree did the uest for permanence produce technologies of sanitation resistant to change 2 did the early focus on project design limit attention to long range planning of the systems 12Part I The Age of Miasmas From Colonial Times to 1880Cities faced poor sanitary conditions and suffered the crippling effects of epidemic diseases with only a vague understanding of their cause 12a few larger cities developed community wide water supply systems with rudimentary distribution networks but continued to regard waste disposal as an individual responsibility The powerful worldwide influence of the the English “sanitary idea” in mid 19th c linked filth with disease sparked interest in sanitation systems for community waste disposal 12miasmas—filth or foul smells—were blamed for epidemicskeep wastes from accumulating in city centersPart II The Bacteriological Revolution 1880 1945development of modern sanitary services 1880 1920—dynamic urban growth in US Biological revolution of late 19th c good impetus inoculation and immunization Interwar years saw solid waste disposal and better services in suburban and rural gradual catch up to urban services 13Part III The New Ecology 1945 2000External forces were central to influencing sanitary services after WWII Urban sprawl and decay of urban core—permanence of sanitary systems—presented challenges Added to biological forms of pollution were chemicalindustrial pollutants The emergence of New Ecology and the modern environmental movement caused a reevaluation of sanitary systems So too with the “garbage crisis” on the horizon—solid waste and landfills and tougher environmental legislation 14EPILOGUE The environmental paradigm shift from miasmas to bacteria did not radically disrupt or change the old system of collection—which were generally successful in distancing humans from their wastes and discards In fact the “front of pipe” components in these technologies remained largely the same while it did inform some innovations in confronting “end of pipe” problems— ie water treatment and refining did not call into uestion the basic precept of permanent citywide sanitary systems 424 Because waste and water systems were built to be permanent rather than resilient future generations could not easily choose to abandon these systems but instead had to maintain and expand them Though built with permanence in mind to justify initial costs to their community the lack of flexibility came at a cost to future decision makers Runoff and non point pollution were not anticipated from the initial designs of these systems and are thus difficult late 20th century pollutant problems “Modular flexibility” is the goal of new designs of infrastructure “To function effectively the American city has to be a sanitary city”426

  • Paperback
  • 400
  • The Sanitary City Environmental Services in Urban America from Colonial Times to the Present Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ
  • Martin V. Melosi
  • English
  • 19 August 2019
  • 9780822959830

About the Author: Martin V. Melosi

Martin Victor Melosi is Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen University Professor and the director of the Center for Public History at the University of Houston in Houston Texas