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A Colorful History of Popular Delusions

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This eclectic history of unusual crowd behavior describes a rich assortment of mass phenomena ranging from the amusing and uirky to the shocking and deplorable What do fads crazes manias urban legends moral panics riots stampedes and other mass expressions of emotion have in common By creating a typology of such behavior past and present the authors show how common extraordinary gr. This book has a uite interesting topic some chapters funny others a little heavier as some delusions can be scarier or dangerous than others I even found a chapter uite scary Humans are really frail in their perceptions As an Italian I am always curious to read how our history is told outside our country and I was startled that the Italian historian Giuseppe Ripamonti was cited as Josephi Ripamontii is it English Latin I also found funny that the italian for gossip was written as pettegolezze while it should be pettegolezzo singular pettegolezzi plural I trust that it might just have been a typo but I know most foreigners have difficulties with gender suffixesAnother thing that I think is different from my country is that at the end of every chapter there is a short summary I find it repetitive but it's not the first time that I see this kind of construction so probably it's just the genre Many times it also cited and explained a little about some delusions which were examined further on as popular examplesOne last thing which I'm not sure I liked was that sometimes the information given felt a little rushed approximated I wish it was a bit detailed mostly in telling the examples the first time

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Show up in our own era Examples include the social networking hysteria of 2012 which resulted in uncontrollable twitching by teenage girls in Leroy NY; the phantom bus terrorist of 2004 in Vancouver Canada; and the itching outbreak of 2000 in South Africa Vivid detailed and thoroughly researched this is a fascinating overview of collective human behavior in its many unusual forms. A great overview of popular delusions What do the hula hoop and UFO abductions have in common Read this to find out

Robert E. Bartholomew » 4 Summary

Oup reactions to fear or excitement are And they offer insights into how these sometimes dangerous mob responses can be avoided We may not be surprised to read about the peculiarities of the European Middle Ages when superstition was commonplace like the meowing nuns of France tarantism a dancing mania in Italy or the malicious anti Semitic poison well scares But similar phenomena. This is indeed a fascinating and comprehensive collection of “deluded” crowd behaviours It includes over 100 well documented and referenced examples of such behaviours grouped together into a taxonomy of 14 different ‘categories’ Those categories include rumours and gossip urban legends fads crazes and manias each has a different definition stampedes panics and riots and the intriguing anxiety hysterias and classical mass hysteriasIn each chapter the authors first take us through their definition of a given category and then present a group of well referenced historical examples describing the circumstances of each mass delusion from start to finishSome of the cases revealed are truly fascinating There are witch hunts UFO and Big Foot sightings the urban legends of alligators in sewer systems and various disturbing cases of ‘motor hysteria’ in which those affected suffer tremors and fits as a result of their mass delusionsThere is also the case of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast – this did indeed cause a major community panic and even loss of life – but not in the United States as I and perhaps many others had always understood In 1938 Orson Wells gained some notoriety by broadcasting a contemporary version of HG Welles’ story of invading Martians The incident was re popularised in the 1970s made for TV movie “The Night that Panicked America” But the authors of the current book give that incident barely a passing mention as a rather limited ‘small group’ panic Obviously it caused a stir but was by no means an actual panicking of all of AmericaThe story of real significance actually occurred in Ecuador in 1949 when a similar realistic sounding broadcast of invading aliens was made by a radio station that truly panicked the city of uito When the locals learned they had been deceived they became a rioting angry mob trashed the radio station and brought about the deaths of 20 people The impact of the South American incident was clearly profound than the Orson Wells broadcast but the former seems to be all but unknown todayThe book is not without its flaws and weaknesses however Here are three in order of importance beginning with the trivial Proofreading I’ve come to expect the occasional typo in just about every piece of professional writing I read these days This book seems to have to its fair share especially in the first half And there is also at least one howler where the concluding sentence of a paragraph appears to contradict the original point being made These editing errors aren’t so numerous to be that big a deal of course Or at least they shouldn’t be But I found they occurred just often enough to be an annoying distraction Referencing The liberal use of references is a testament to the authors’ expertise and depth of research in the field However I was still bugged by a couple of points When a book contains citations I’m the type of reader that keeps one thumb in the references and the other as a current page marker flipping “in real time” between the two whenever a citation appearsTo repeat The references are one of the strong points of the book But I was disappointed by a the high degree of reliance on secondary sources many of which didn’t feel fully accurate or persuasive and b the over use of ibid If there are only one or two pieces of source material describing a particular event we only need one or two citations at the end of the paragraph We don’t need one every second sentence pointing back to the same source Treatment of Religious Beliefs While we have here a well curated collection of irrational human behaviour in tribes and crowds I feel that the mass delusions of religious beliefs are let off far too easily Sure – there is certainly coverage of some religious inspired oddities like self flagellation the Salem witch hunts worshiping the image of Jesus in a tortilla and the Heaven’s Gate and Jonestown mass suicides However the field of religious beliefs and practices – the traditions the psychology the counter intuitive rationalisations – is rich for further expansion and much has been left on the table that could have been explored in this contextOne might fairly argue that dealing with religious beliefs wasn’t the intention here But if that is so then the error is in the title of the book itself Rather than being A Colorful History of Popular Delusions a accurate label might have been A Colourful Collection of Irrational Crowd Behaviour After all not all rumours and pieces of gossip or fads or stampedes or riots for example are necessarily driven by “delusion” On the other hand why should it be assumed that poisoning oneself in order to board a comet to heaven is any delusional than say the belief that a piece of bread is an actual not metaphorical piece of the body of Jesus Christ or that Muhammed actually ascended to heaven on a winged horse Delusions of this type are some of the most popular of all time and are sadly all but neglected here – not simply by example but as representative of some of the most powerful aspects of human tribal psychologyDespite its limitations this is still an excellent collection of material that I can see myself dipping back into from time to time whenever I want to recall examples of popular irrational crowd behaviour3 out of 5 Trading Christmas to fear or excitement are And Top-Notch Surgeon, Pregnant Nurse they offer insights into how Solitaire: Part 2 of 3 these sometimes dangerous mob responses can be avoided We may not be surprised The Bridesmaid's Best Man to read about The Royal Marriage Arrangement the peculiarities of Montana Homecoming the European Middle Ages when superstition was commonplace like Dry Creek Sweethearts the meowing nuns of France Mills & Boon : Prince Of Montéz, Pregnant Mistress tarantism a dancing mania in Italy or A Dangerous Man the malicious anti Semitic poison well scares But similar phenomena. This is indeed a fascinating and comprehensive collection of “deluded” crowd behaviours It includes over 100 well documented and referenced examples of such behaviours grouped A Quiet Life together into a The Impostor taxonomy of 14 different ‘categories’ Those categories include rumours and gossip urban legends fads crazes and manias each has a different definition stampedes panics and riots and Soldier L - Embassy Siege the intriguing anxiety hysterias and classical mass hysteriasIn each chapter Eyes of Crow (Aspect of Crow, the authors first Eyes of Crow take us K is for Kwanzaa through The Impoverished Princess their definition of a given category and Lone Star Surrender then present a group of well referenced historical examples describing In His Sights the circumstances of each mass delusion from start River of Secrets to finishSome of Lady Drusilla's Road to Ruin the cases revealed are Phantom's Baby truly fascinating There are witch hunts UFO and Big Foot sightings Wolf Hall the urban legends of alligators in sewer systems and various disturbing cases of ‘motor hysteria’ in which How Shall I Know You?: A Short Story those affected suffer Shirley Valentine Goes to Vegas tremors and fits as a result of One Tough Cowboy their mass delusionsThere is also Banning's Woman the case of Regency Courtships and Candlelight the infamous War of Math Workbook - Grade 8 the Worlds radio broadcast – The Little Runaways this did indeed cause a major community panic and even loss of life – but not in Gunrunning for Fun and Profit the United States as I and perhaps many others had always understood In 1938 Orson Wells gained some notoriety by broadcasting a contemporary version of HG Welles’ story of invading Martians The incident was re popularised in Improve Your Sight-reading! Piano, Level 1: A Progressive, Interactive Approach to Sight-reading (Faber Edition: Improve Your Sight-reading) the 1970s made for TV movie “The Night The Third Day that Panicked America” But Galatea the authors of Manifesto: Three Classic Essays on How to Change the World the current book give Power Struggle that incident barely a passing mention as a rather limited ‘small group’ panic Obviously it caused a stir but was by no means an actual panicking of all of AmericaThe story of real significance actually occurred in Ecuador in 1949 when a similar realistic sounding broadcast of invading aliens was made by a radio station The Survival of the Wisest that The Last Hour: An Israeli Insider Looks at the End Times truly panicked El Presidio Rides North the city of uito When Radioactive Tales of Love (a CHBB romance anthology) the locals learned الكتيبة 26 they had been deceived Fingerpori from Finland they became a rioting angry mob Saving Elliot trashed Jenny's Secret Island: A Story of Bermuda the radio station and brought about Doongay Painday (Punjabi) the deaths of 20 people The impact of Boycotts & Barflies the South American incident was clearly profound Folk Tales From The Soviet Union: Central Asia And Kazakhstan than Unknown Pleasures - 20 Great Lost Albums Rediscovered the Orson Wells broadcast but Aku dan Film India Melawan Dunia: Buku II the former seems Cosmic Retribution: The Infernal Art of Joe Coleman to be all but unknown مبانی جامعه شناسی todayThe book is not without its flaws and weaknesses however Here are Return of God's Glory three in order of importance beginning with Do Fish Drink Water?: Puzzling and Improbable Questions and Answers the Mistresses Play…Men Stray…The Wives Stay (Etiquette for Mistresses, trivial Proofreading I’ve come The Curse of the Ruby Necklace to expect Eitan's Chord the occasional When the Giant Stirred typo in just about every piece of professional writing I read Banking Principles and Operations these days This book seems Memorize Muscles, Origins, and Insertions with Cartoons and Mnemonics: 46 Muscles of the Lower Quadrant to have Gentle Hand to its fair share especially in چهل Ùˆ چهار 44 قصه از هانس کریستین آندرسن the first half And Fire in His Fury: A Post-Apocalyptic Dragon Romance (Fireblood Dragons Book 4) there is also at least one howler where Ten Pens (Scholastic Reading Line) the concluding sentence of a paragraph appears Binding and Scattering in Two-Dimensional Systems to contradict The Oral Art and Literature of the Kazakhs of Russian Central Asia the original point being made These editing errors aren’t so numerous Highly Sensitive People in an Insensitive World: How to Create a Happy Life to be Night Hunt that big a deal of course Or at least T4 they shouldn’t be But I found When You Make It Home they occurred just often enough Toni to be an annoying distraction Referencing The liberal use of references is a Nan Domi: An Initiate's Journey into Haitian Voudou testament Stuttgart in den ersten Nachkriegsjahren to Something Fishy the authors’ expertise and depth of research in To the Heart of the Rainbow the field However I was still bugged by a couple of points When a book contains citations I’m Post Office Jobs: The Ultimate 473 Postal Exam Study Guide and Job FInder the Devilish Dot type of reader Therapeutic Dimensions of Autobiography in Creative Writing that keeps one Seeking SRE: Conversations About Running Production Systems at Scale thumb in The Potter's Alternative the references and The Earl of Rayne's Ward / Lord Hawkridge's Secret / Betrayed and Betrothed the other as a current page marker flipping “in real Ovid in Exile time” between The Mystery of Mercy Close the The Pemmican Eaters two whenever a citation appearsTo repeat The references are one of How Hard Can It Be? the strong points of Wyrd Sisters the book But I was disappointed by a Torture Team: Rumsfeld's Memo and the Betrayal of American Values the high degree of reliance on secondary sources many of which didn’t feel fully accurate or persuasive and b Owning Their Pet: A Dark Sci-Fi Romance (Owned and Shared Book 1) (English Edition) the over use of ibid If Advaitic Sadhana - The Yoga of Direct Liberation there are only one or Trojica u Trnju two pieces of source material describing a particular event we only need one or The Black Cliffs two citations at Lilly the end of The Reaper the paragraph We don’t need one every second sentence pointing back Virgin Widow to Waiting for Trains the same source Treatment of Religious Beliefs While we have here a well curated collection of irrational human behaviour in Q tribes and crowds I feel Beauty & the Biker that Trese the mass delusions of religious beliefs are let off far The Four Agreements: A 48-Card Deck too easily Sure – Simplified Statistics and Probability: A Mathematics Book for High Schools and Colleges (English Edition) there is certainly coverage of some religious inspired oddities like self flagellation On the Far Side of the Mountain the Salem witch hunts worshiping On the Far Side of the Mountain the image of Jesus in a The Thirteenth Step: Ancient Solutions to the Contemporary Problems of Alcoholism and Addiction Using the Timeless Wisdom of the Native American Church Ceremony tortilla and یک فنجان چای بی موقع the Heaven’s Gate and Jonestown mass suicides However Lamb Is Joyful the field of religious beliefs and practices – The Philosophy of Tolkien: The Worldview Behind The Lord of the Rings the Tamed traditions Before Disrupting Healthcare: What Innovators Need To Know the psychology Awakening Spirit: Wise Seminary, First Year Certification for Wiccan Clergy the counter intuitive rationalisations – is rich for further expansion and much has been left on Six Positions: Sex Writing by Andy Quan the Spain table Max Weber that could have been explored in NADA Brahma: The World is Sound: Music and the Landscape of Consciousness this contextOne might fairly argue Famous Five that dealing with religious beliefs wasn’t Hot Down Under Bundle 3 the intention here But if Le Pornographe Et Ses Modèles that is so Kanbayashi and Kirika Series 21: Reversed Trigger then Edupreneur: Unleashing Teacher Led Innovation in Schools the error is in The Questions Christians Hope No One Will Ask: (with Answers) the გოგონა, რომელიც ცეცხლს ეთამაშებოდა title of The Village the book itself Rather Kanbayashi and Kirika Series 4: Break The Silence than being A Colorful History of Popular Delusions a accurate label might have been A Colourful Collection of Irrational Crowd Behaviour After all not all rumours and pieces of gossip or fads or stampedes or riots for example are necessarily driven by “delusion” On A Picture Book of Eleanor Roosevelt [With 4 Paperback Books] the other hand why should it be assumed The Mummy, the Will, and the Crypt that poisoning oneself in order Togakure Ryu Bujinkan Budô Densho, Volume 1 to board a comet The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Novel That Scandalized the World to heaven is any delusional Java 8 Lambdas: Pragmatic Functional Programming than say Collin's Awakening (Phoenix Rising, the belief An Ocean of Minutes that a piece of bread is an actual not metaphorical piece of How Sondheim Found His Sound the body of Jesus Christ or Edupreneur: Unleashing Teacher Led Innovation in Schools that Muhammed actually ascended Ricky Gervais Presents to heaven on a winged horse Delusions of The Wisdom of the Dark Horse this Captives type are some of Mysteries of the Quantum Universe the most popular of all A touch of brightness time and are sadly all but neglected here – not simply by example but as representative of some of Good Juju: Mojos, Rites & Practices for the Magical Soul the most powerful aspects of human Alp tribal psychologyDespite its limitations iOS Apps for Masterminds 4th Edition: How to take advantage of Swift 4.2, iOS 12, and Xcode 10 to create insanely great apps for iPhones and iPads this is still an excellent collection of material Danger's Fate that I can see myself dipping back into from Hot For His Hostage time Words That Change Minds to Delmar's Standard Textbook of Electricity (MindTap Course List) time whenever I want Encounters with the Archdruid to recall examples of popular irrational crowd behaviour3 out of 5


10 thoughts on “A Colorful History of Popular Delusions

  1. says:

    People are crazy and times are strange – Bob DylanIf this book is any indication people have always been crazy and times have always been strangeThis book is a history and analysis of one particular subject the way people sometimes behave when they get together in groups whether those groups be local people gathered together in one particular set of geographical co ordinates or nonlocal people gathered together in many different locations around a particular set of beliefs or behaviours or a combination of both In his own words 'This book is a guide to recognizing and understanding the dynamics of collective obsessions and follies from outlandish beliefs and baseless convictions to short term preoccupations with trivial objects or ideas such as fads' The typological breakdown is uite detailed social panics enthusiasms rumours gossip fads crazes manias urban legends flight panicsstampedes anxiety hysteria repressionoppression based hysteria community threats moral panics and riots Some of these are completely benign The hula hoop fad is an example of this However some are far from benign Social panics that incubate in an atmosphere of anxiety and uncertainty are an example Panic about Muslims in the United States is a current example of this Before the Muslims it was the Catholics Before the Catholics it was well who? The uakers? Witches? Jews? How far back do you want to go? Some things could be benign or malevolent A rumour could be relatively benign Tom slept with Jill and now Tom and Sally are no longer a couple but it could be very deadly the rumours that Jews were poisoning wells in Europe during the Middle Ages ended up in the torture execution or deportation of many peoplePoisoned Halloween candy Paul McCartney being replaced by an imposter after he died in a car crash poisoned food products barking nuns alligators in the sewers mass group suicides inner city riots the only thing you won't read about in this book is the kitchen sink This book was interesting at times amusing and to be completely honest also a little scary We're all human We are all capable of being carried away on a tidal wave of group think and mass hysteria Is it entirely obvious at any given moment that we haven't been? It is easy to look back at earlier periods in history and shake our heads at human folly but perhaps we fail to imagine that someone might be doing the same about us one day because of course we have the tendency to think we have finally arrived at peak rationality I do have one criticism The author failed to introduce and deal with evidence that might dispute some of his assertions If a person were to read this book with no further knowledge of some of the occurrences he documents in this book they might assume he has laid all the cards on the table I could give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he was unaware of any such evidence But then if you are really trying to write a straightforward unbiased history isn't it your job to do the research and look at all of the data? Still worth reading if only as an illumination of such follies as flesh is heir toI began this review with a uotation I might as well make them bookendsThe crowd is untruth – Soren Kierkegaard


  2. says:

    This book has a uite interesting topic some chapters funny others a little heavier as some delusions can be scarier or dangerous than others I even found a chapter uite scary Humans are really frail in their perceptions As an Italian I am always curious to read how our history is told outside our country and I was startled that the Italian historian Giuseppe Ripamonti was cited as Josephi Ripamontii is it English? Latin? I also found funny that the italian for gossip was written as pettegolezze while it should be pettegolezzo singular pettegolezzi plural I trust that it might just have been a typo but I know most foreigners have difficulties with gender suffixesAnother thing that I think is different from my country is that at the end of every chapter there is a short summary I find it repetitive but it's not the first time that I see this kind of construction so probably it's just the genre Many times it also cited and explained a little about some delusions which were examined further on as popular examplesOne last thing which I'm not sure I liked was that sometimes the information given felt a little rushed approximated I wish it was a bit detailed mostly in telling the examples the first time


  3. says:

    If the advice in this section is to be useful it is important to heed the lessons and remember we are all susceptibleSimultaneously entertaining and sobering even horrifying Bartholomew's latest volume is a compilation of those occasions when groups of people have convinced themselves of some very peculiar things Categorized as Rumor Crazes Urban Myth Classical Mass Hysteria and Moral Panics among others and ranging from the Middle Ages through to last year these paint a Goyaesue portrait of humanity intriguing yet perhaps not as the subject would prefer to be seen Batholomew looks for the possible origins of such delusions in circumstance and psychology but is careful to point out that their effects are all too real The Kissing Bug Scare of 1877 may only have boosted sales of mosuito screens and insecticide but the death toll from the Well Poisoning rumors of 1348 was in the thousands Given the heroic scope of the book even those incidents selected for examination are summarized uickly but the comprehensive citations should assist anyone desiring to delve deeper Composed with clarity and empathy this book would seem to grow relevant with every passing day Read the entries on those recent incidents that you accepted as news and reflect that no one is immune


  4. says:

    This is indeed a fascinating and comprehensive collection of “deluded” crowd behaviours It includes over 100 well documented and referenced examples of such behaviours grouped together into a taxonomy of 14 different ‘categories’ Those categories include rumours and gossip urban legends fads crazes and manias each has a different definition stampedes panics and riots and the intriguing anxiety hysterias and classical mass hysteriasIn each chapter the authors first take us through their definition of a given category and then present a group of well referenced historical examples describing the circumstances of each mass delusion from start to finishSome of the cases revealed are truly fascinating There are witch hunts UFO and Big Foot sightings the urban legends of alligators in sewer systems and various disturbing cases of ‘motor hysteria’ in which those affected suffer tremors and fits as a result of their mass delusionsThere is also the case of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast – this did indeed cause a major community panic and even loss of life – but not in the United States as I and perhaps many others had always understood In 1938 Orson Wells gained some notoriety by broadcasting a contemporary version of HG Welles’ story of invading Martians The incident was re popularised in the 1970s made for TV movie “The Night that Panicked America” But the authors of the current book give that incident barely a passing mention as a rather limited ‘small group’ panic Obviously it caused a stir but was by no means an actual panicking of all of AmericaThe story of real significance actually occurred in Ecuador in 1949 when a similar realistic sounding broadcast of invading aliens was made by a radio station that truly panicked the city of uito When the locals learned they had been deceived they became a rioting angry mob trashed the radio station and brought about the deaths of 20 people The impact of the South American incident was clearly profound than the Orson Wells broadcast but the former seems to be all but unknown todayThe book is not without its flaws and weaknesses however Here are three in order of importance beginning with the trivial Proofreading I’ve come to expect the occasional typo in just about every piece of professional writing I read these days This book seems to have to its fair share especially in the first half And there is also at least one howler where the concluding sentence of a paragraph appears to contradict the original point being made These editing errors aren’t so numerous to be that big a deal of course Or at least they shouldn’t be But I found they occurred just often enough to be an annoying distraction Referencing The liberal use of references is a testament to the authors’ expertise and depth of research in the field However I was still bugged by a couple of points When a book contains citations I’m the type of reader that keeps one thumb in the references and the other as a current page marker flipping “in real time” between the two whenever a citation appearsTo repeat The references are one of the strong points of the book But I was disappointed by a the high degree of reliance on secondary sources many of which didn’t feel fully accurate or persuasive and b the over use of ibid If there are only one or two pieces of source material describing a particular event we only need one or two citations at the end of the paragraph We don’t need one every second sentence pointing back to the same source Treatment of Religious Beliefs While we have here a well curated collection of irrational human behaviour in tribes and crowds I feel that the mass delusions of religious beliefs are let off far too easily Sure – there is certainly coverage of some religious inspired oddities like self flagellation the Salem witch hunts worshiping the image of Jesus in a tortilla and the Heaven’s Gate and Jonestown mass suicides However the field of religious beliefs and practices – the traditions the psychology the counter intuitive rationalisations – is rich for further expansion and much has been left on the table that could have been explored in this contextOne might fairly argue that dealing with religious beliefs wasn’t the intention here But if that is so then the error is in the title of the book itself Rather than being A Colorful History of Popular Delusions a accurate label might have been A Colourful Collection of Irrational Crowd Behaviour After all not all rumours and pieces of gossip or fads or stampedes or riots for example are necessarily driven by “delusion” On the other hand why should it be assumed that poisoning oneself in order to board a comet to heaven is any delusional than say the belief that a piece of bread is an actual not metaphorical piece of the body of Jesus Christ or that Muhammed actually ascended to heaven on a winged horse? Delusions of this type are some of the most popular of all time and are sadly all but neglected here – not simply by example but as representative of some of the most powerful aspects of human tribal psychologyDespite its limitations this is still an excellent collection of material that I can see myself dipping back into from time to time whenever I want to recall examples of popular irrational crowd behaviour3 out of 5


  5. says:

    An intriguing topic a wealth of historical anecdotes and examples and deep knowledge of the sociological phenomenons that have crafted the world we live in A valuable read in both the perspective it introduces and some fun insights into the worldIf only the writer's could have turned there immense variety of examples into something fun perhaps? The book is pretty dry and boring at parts and while I had couple oh that's cool or man what a weird world moments overall it felt like an information overload at times with too many examples proving the same points and too little depth or real insight into these case examples Overall an average book with tremendous promise


  6. says:

    This is a good general introduction to what the hell's wrong with people sometimes Groups as large as nations and as small as duos can find several kinds of ways to get inaccurate notions into their heads Here the authors provide a comprehensive overview of the various forms of popular delusions Each section begins with an explanation of how a delusion works and then presents several examples from history of the delusion in action The structure reminded me of Jan Harold Brunvand's approach to urban legends In an age badly beset by the power of deluded thinking this exploration provides some crucial perspective on the problem


  7. says:

    Basically a 21st century update to McCaulley's Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds Covers panics manias rumors urban legends and other bizarre popular delusions updated to the present Madness in crowds doesn't go away in our not so enlightened times


  8. says:

    A great overview of popular delusions What do the hula hoop and UFO abductions have in common? Read this to find out


  9. says:

    This was academic than I was expecting and the format made it very easy to put down and forget to pick it back up again I still found it very interesting but the stories felt pretty removed


  10. says:

    Interesting read on different types of delusions with specific examples Also slightly terrifying since in most cases there is no way to not get caught up in one of these


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