Frances and Bernard review Û 109

Frances and Bernard

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Ous taxis that can take you anywhere at all long talks along the Hudson as the lights of the Empire State Building blink on aboveInspired by the lives of Flannery O’Connor and Robert Lowell It's not very often that I find in a novel two characters so deeply interesting and so fully human as Frances and Bernard are in this work Their relationship and it's gradual progression form the entire plot of this novel and though it is only 200 pages it succeeds in telling an engaging and complete taleSince F B is told solely through a series of letters Bauer trusts the reader to fill in some of the gaps in facts the information the letter writers are witholding That trust in her readers makes the reading experience all the enjoyable We know that Frances's reserved manner will come into conflict with Bernard's impulsive style so when it does it is all the rewardingI can't say enough how engaging and sharp and dynamic and fundamentally human the two central characters are Their relationship evolves over the course of years and seeing their authorial voices change in the letters gave me the feeling I was growing with them I would imagine most readers will grow to love both characters but Frances was the most engaging to me Her biting wit made me laugh out loud even through emotionally difficult passages and her active inner life makes her a great reader surrogate I was also so excited to see religious thinking humans portrayed so humanely and thoughtfully As the book puts it neither character is a demagogue or a rubeI was totally surprised and charmed by this book which at its end left in me an aching nostalgia for two lives I didn't even live This is well worth your time if you enjoy any sort of character driven work

free read Ù E-book, or Kindle E-pub ï Carlene Bauer

Frances and Bernard meet in the summer of 1957 Afterward he writes her a letter Soon they are immersed in the kind of fast deep friendship that can change the course of our livesThey find the So what we have here is an epistolary novel about writers who meet in a writer’s colony inspired by real life writers and written bywell a writer Based very loosely on the real life correspondence of Flannery O’Connor and Robert Lowell Ms Bauer creates two characters that are sort of stand ins for the famous writing pairbut notThe first thing the reader has to decide is “How much should the real O’Connor Lowell story influence my reading?” My personal answer was “Not much” Sure O’Connor was a fervent but non didactic Catholic with a flair for the ironic and allegorical and yes Lowell came from a Boston Brahmin family went to Harvard converted to Catholicism and wrote confessional poetry But there’s where the similarities begin and endFrances is from a working class Philadelphia family and is awarded the gift of good health here She meets Bernard who has a far greater zest for life and off they go Frances notes to a friend that maybe she was “jealous of his ability to charm and be gracious and make it seem effortless make it seem an extension of his intelligence While I tend to silently judge or make an untimely crack” Their powerful intellectualism rules the day and some of the meaty parts focus on their conversations about Catholic theology Curiously neither start at suare one uestioning the very existence of Christ or accepted dogma; rather they dutifully accept it and start at suare two mulling over how to be a person of faith Frances by far the bigger believer writes “I don’t want to forget to say that it’s a common mistake to confuse severity for spiritual radiance I think many religious folk mistakenly champion the importance of being ramrod” Bernard on the other hand states “I did not like church but I wanted an absolute and I wanted its demands” His fervor he admits was likely self adornmentThe two bond over their communication on their writing religion their inabilities to strongly adhere to preconceived roles their families and their growing feelings for each other In real life O’Connor and Lowell were not lovers The book is almost a five star but not uite Interestingly as Frances and Bernard stray into less intellectual and emotionally wrought areas they become – to this reader – slightly inorganic Perhaps it’s the overlay of their famous real life counterparts that sets up certain expectations In any event the “holy friendship” they might have been subconsciously enacting becomes of a run of the mill narrative That being said I was still tempted to go up a star because of the powerful writing and brilliant ending Cradle of Solitude pairbut notThe first thing the reader has to decide is “How much should the real O’Connor Lowell story influence my reading?” My Cowboy Under the Mistletoe personal answer was “Not much” Sure O’Connor was a fervent but non didactic Catholic with a flair for the ironic and allegorical and yes Lowell came from a Boston Brahmin family went to Harvard converted to Catholicism and wrote confessional The Christmas Wedding Quilt: Let It Snow\You Better Watch Out\Nine Ladies Dancing poetry But there’s where the similarities begin and endFrances is from a working class Philadelphia family and is awarded the gift of good health here She meets Bernard who has a far greater zest for life and off they go Frances notes to a friend that maybe she was “jealous of his ability to charm and be gracious and make it seem effortless make it seem an extension of his intelligence While I tend to silently judge or make an untimely crack” Their Crybaby Falls powerful intellectualism rules the day and some of the meaty Criminal Intent parts focus on their conversations about Catholic theology Curiously neither start at suare one uestioning the very existence of Christ or accepted dogma; rather they dutifully accept it and start at suare two mulling over how to be a The Sharpshooter's Secret Son person of faith Frances by far the bigger believer writes “I don’t want to forget to say that it’s a common mistake to confuse severity for spiritual radiance I think many religious folk mistakenly champion the importance of being ramrod” Bernard on the other hand states “I did not like church but I wanted an absolute and I wanted its demands” His fervor he admits was likely self adornmentThe two bond over their communication on their writing religion their inabilities to strongly adhere to Criminal Intent preconceived roles their families and their growing feelings for each other In real life O’Connor and Lowell were not lovers The book is almost a five star but not uite Interestingly as Frances and Bernard stray into less intellectual and emotionally wrought areas they become – to this reader – slightly inorganic Perhaps it’s the overlay of their famous real life counterparts that sets up certain expectations In any event the “holy friendship” they might have been subconsciously enacting becomes of a run of the mill narrative That being said I was still tempted to go up a star because of the The Daddy List powerful writing and brilliant ending

Carlene Bauer ï 9 free download

Ir way to New York and for a few whirling years each other The city is a wonderland for young people with dreams cramped West Village kitchens parties stocked with the sharp witted and glamor Read this Read this now Romantic beautiful and heartbreaking Edited After I finished this book I considered re reading it immediately The Cowboy's Baby Bond people with dreams cramped West Village kitchens Cop Next Door parties stocked with the sharp witted and glamor Read this Read this now Romantic beautiful and heartbreaking Edited After I finished this book I considered re reading it immediately

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