Les larmes d'Éros review ✓ 103



10 thoughts on “Les larmes d'Éros

  1. says:

    The doors of my mind have only recently opened to and been opened by Bataille so what I say about The Tears of Eros will necessarily be that of a novice There’s a thrill tinged with anxiety of being an intellectual novice at the age of 45We have hanging in our house a woodblock print done by a friend of ours of a gaunt and cigarette smoking Joan Didion Worked into this portrait is a uote of hers I know what nothing means and keep on playing I have not read a single book of Didion’s but this uote means a lot to me I read it as an inspirational message as does my wife but I know our individual interpretations of it are fundamentally different though I have no interest in discussing this difference of interpretation with her It is enough that the phrase has significant meaning however different for each of usIt means so much to me because in recent years my spiritual path or search for authenticity has become centered on nothingness Truth exists but only as founded on nothingness which for me means that no thought or construct of meaning can contain truth It’s not exactly a matter of faith but very similar Faith too often is nothing than faith in a pat and simple minded thought My concern is to be to go beyond thought and to play as if suspended in this profound void of non thought spewing forth thoughts ironically And this concern is at the root of Bataille’s search also though there are fundamental differences between Bataille’s and my involvement with this concern These differences primarily involve Bataille’s seeming isolationist nature while for me these “higher reaches” of nothingness are suffused with interpersonal connectivity but I won’t go into this any furtherIn The Tears of Eros this nothingness this ineffable peak beyond all thought is illustrated by an ancient cave painting In this cave painting a gored buffalo with entrails spilling out is charging or has charged the man responsible for its mortal wound This man is apparently dead or dying a victim of his victim the charging buffalo and is sporting a uite prominent erection This painting serves as a kind of shorthand code for Bataille’s concerns a primal linking of eroticism and death a linking of peak ineffable experience spiked with despair and vanishment As an aside for Bataille “eroticism” is not necessarily the sexual but is rather purposeless sensual enjoyment as opposed to work or utility This bears some similarities to Aleister Crowley’s adage For pure will unassuaged of purpose delivered from the lust of result This painting is so significant for Bataille as a representation of his non verbal concerns that he wisely does not kill its significance by discussing it; he merely hints at its profundity teasing the reader to briefly grasp its meaning beyond the words provided This painting serves as a kind of flashing window a window flashing in and out of apprehension into the charged nothingness that Bataille pursued to the ends of his thoughts and beyond An even extreme and illustrative example of his concerns is saved for a very brief discussion at the end of the book It is a photograph of a Chinese man undergoing horrible torturous mutilation In the picture both the man’s arms have been lopped off; his pectorals have been sliced off; and a man is in the process of sawing through one of his legs Bataille asserts that the face of this man with eyes raised heaven ward a la St Joan of Arc is expressing a kind of joy or transcendence coupled with extreme pain and despair obviously and so has served as profound inspiration for him he owned a copy of the picture and spent much time contemplating it This example did not convince me as other details of Bataille’s arguments throughout the book did not convince me At times his fervor to believe what he himself was writing led him to see in things only that which corresponded with his thought As when he asserts that apes and all animals by extension have no concern for their dead and when he says that apes have no sense of humor I don’t think either of these is totally true These are only uibbles but were enough to form chinks in the armor of his thoughts; but then again Bataille is not concerned overmuch with logical argument being an aesthete or a poet so in a way these chinks only make his thought even authentic to me as passion trumps logic any day


  2. says:

    I absolutely bought this book because the cover matches my favourite blue nail polish exactly really I didn't understand a word he was saying but I looked impossibly chic while reading it


  3. says:

    Originally given three stars back in '08 read in September of 2007 but after a second reading I've decided to add an additional half star rounding up to four Bataille's a strange cat Despite some fascinating information here eg the paintings in the Lascaux pit the lack of substance behind Bataille's theoriesassertions often reduces the text to a series of disjointed declarations


  4. says:

    Philosophers don't get to write about history any because they don't write anything that makes sense It's the new law established by me My problems with this book are many First is that it is way too vague and homogenizing The book covers the entire history of civilization mostly Western except when he takes Chinese torture victims and Voodoo practitioners out of context for no reason in 200ish pages the majority of which are taken up with illustrations So of course he can't actually say anything he can only scrape up some vague examples of situations which were both erotic and violent He entirely eschews any context for why a civilization would mingle ideas of sex and violence or what the long term implications are of that phenomenon Does it perpetuate violence? Does it normalize sex? Who knows certainly not BatailleObviously I'm a scholar of the twenty first century but I really felt like something was left to be desired from his interpretation I wanted to hear about gendered dimensions of violence I wanted to hear about drugs and alcohol I wanted to hear about class differences I wanted to hear about race and culture I wanted ANYTHING that was an actual dimension of this phenomenon If this were a freshman philosophy paper I'd fail itHe also does this irritating thing of saying that something is erotic and horrifying but doesn't explain why it is erotic At the end he has g r a p h i c images of a Chinese man having his flesh hacked off while he is still alive In this picture the man's ribs can be seen but he is wearing a kind of glassy eyed expression presumably caused by the opium which was given to these victims so that they did not pass out from the pain I clearly understand the tragic part of this example HOWEVER he does not explain what is supposed to be erotic about this He hints that the smile is indicative of a kind of ecstasy on the behalf of the tortured man? YikesIf he just wanted to write about his gore related sexual fetishes he could have kept those to himself


  5. says:

    Georges Bataille's great illustrated book on the connection between eroticism and death The two doorways one can't avoid yet we are drawn to its power One of the great poetic essayists Bataille is sort of like the moment one wakes up from a feverish dream You have a memory of that dream but then you are not fully awake


  6. says:

    This book disturbed even me


  7. says:

    I picked this up due to a search for a better understanding of sexual attitudes and life I grew up with views from religions and schools about abstinence from sex while coping with my own libido instincts This book liberates me as a human to understand why humans have sexual impulses; why death is not as scary even without any religion; and finally why I find myself comfortable in expressing my sexual thoughts while living amongst Asians who are mostly conservatives


  8. says:

    I wonder if the makers of Martyrs had this in mind


  9. says:

    A collection of dirty and violent pictures that touches on eroticism and death I read it and laugh Only in the face of horror does the fragmentary totality of being become uncovered


  10. says:

    The usual Bataille waffle on eroticism and death this time with the inclusion of a lot of pretty pictures The images make up the bulk of the book and in short are often far engaging than the obtuse points attempting to be made by the incredibly sparse text


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Les larmes d'Éros

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Michel FoucaultGeorges Bataille was born in Billom France in 1897 He was a librarian by profession Also a philosopher novelist and critic he was founder of the College of Sociology In 1959 Bataille began Tears of Eros and it was completed in 1961 his final work City Lights published two of his other works Story of the Eye and The Impossible Bataille died in 1962. I picked this up due to a search for a better understanding of sexual attitudes and life I grew up with views from religions and schools about abstinence from sex while coping with my own libido instincts This book liberates me as a human to understand why humans have sexual impulses; why death is not as scary even without any religion; and finally why I find myself comfortable in expressing my sexual thoughts while living amongst Asians who are mostly conservatives Course of Action: Out of Harm's Way\Any Time, Any Place religions and schools about abstinence from sex while coping with my own libido instincts This book liberates me as a human to understand why humans have sexual impulses; why death is not as scary even without any Cowboy to the Rescue religion; and finally why I find myself comfortable in expressing my sexual thoughts while living amongst Asians who are mostly conservatives

read ß eBook or Kindle ePUB È Georges Bataille

Tears of Eros is the culmination of Georges Bataille's inuiries into the relationship between violence and the sacred Taking up such figures as Giles de Rais Erzebet Bathory the Maruis de Sade El Greco Gustave Moreau Andre Breton Voodoo practitioners and Chinese torture victims Bataille reveals their common obsession deathThis essay illustrated with artwork from. Originally given three stars back in '08 read in September of 2007 but after a second reading I've decided to add an additional half star rounding up to four Bataille's a strange cat Despite some fascinating information here eg the paintings in the Lascaux pit the lack of substance behind Bataille's theoriesassertions often reduces the text to a series of disjointed declarations Chaos in the Capital City relationship between violence and the sacred Taking up such figures as Giles de Rais Erzebet Bathory the Maruis de Sade El Greco Gustave Moreau Andre Breton Voodoo practitioners and Chinese torture victims Bataille Cowboy at the Crossroads reveals their common obsession deathThis essay illustrated with artwork from. Originally given three stars back in '08 Cowboy Brigade read in September of 2007 but after a second A Cowboy's Pursuit reading I've decided to add an additional half star A Cowboy Summer rounding up to four Bataille's a strange cat Despite some fascinating information here eg the paintings in the Lascaux pit the lack of substance behind Bataille's theoriesassertions often Showdown with the Sheriff reduces the text to a series of disjointed declarations

Georges Bataille È 3 free download

Every era was developed out of ideas explored in Erotism Death and Sexuality and Prehistoric Painting Lascaux or the Birth of Art In it Bataille examines death the little death that follows sexual climax the proximate death in sadomasochistic practices and death as part of religious ritual and sacrificeBataille is one of the most important writers of the century. Philosophers don't get to write about history any because they don't write anything that makes sense It's the new law established by me My problems with this book are many First is that it is way too vague and homogenizing The book covers the entire history of civilization mostly Western except when he takes Chinese torture victims and Voodoo practitioners out of context for no reason in 200ish pages the majority of which are taken up with illustrations So of course he can't actually say anything he can only scrape up some vague examples of situations which were both erotic and violent He entirely eschews any context for why a civilization would mingle ideas of sex and violence or what the long term implications are of that phenomenon Does it perpetuate violence Does it normalize sex Who knows certainly not BatailleObviously I'm a scholar of the twenty first century but I really felt like something was left to be desired from his interpretation I wanted to hear about gendered dimensions of violence I wanted to hear about drugs and alcohol I wanted to hear about class differences I wanted to hear about race and culture I wanted ANYTHING that was an actual dimension of this phenomenon If this were a freshman philosophy paper I'd fail itHe also does this irritating thing of saying that something is erotic and horrifying but doesn't explain why it is erotic At the end he has g r a p h i c images of a Chinese man having his flesh hacked off while he is still alive In this picture the man's ribs can be seen but he is wearing a kind of glassy eyed expression presumably caused by the opium which was given to these victims so that they did not pass out from the pain I clearly understand the tragic part of this example HOWEVER he does not explain what is supposed to be erotic about this He hints that the smile is indicative of a kind of ecstasy on the behalf of the tortured man YikesIf he just wanted to write about his gore related sexual fetishes he could have kept those to himself