Post Everything Summary ↠ 6



10 thoughts on “Post Everything

  1. says:

    45 Similar to Bad Vibes Luke Haines first memoir in that it's clever vicious and fucking hilarious The first book subtitled Britpop and My Part in Its Downfall was so full of stuff I loved stuff I would have loved to have been there for that it short circuited whatever it is that gives me shivers down my spine Haines is a great read himself certainly one of the sharpest current writers in British pop and guitar music though sometimes sentimentally I like these books all the for relating experiences and opinions similar to those of people I've known personally Even when they're a bit wrong like about the greatness of David Essex's two 70s music films – I think you had to see them for the first time as a kid and perhaps not that many years after they were made for them to work their magic Post Everything is as the title suggests a few years later about the late 90s and early to mid 2000s a period which was a pretty depressing in British pop and indie music and b in my own life often not much fun for me and therefore several others a time I'd never want to go back to unless it involved being able to do things differently whilst retaining everything I'd learned from the first iteration and since Haines has also grown up a bit here and whilst over the duration of this book he still excels at pissing off his record companies and ranting at just about everything he isn't as much of an arsehole as during the Britpop era I admired the bravery of his decision explained in the preface to Bad Vibes to write the first book in the persona of his nastier aggressive younger self But OTOH and Post Everything confirms it he might not be incredibly sensitive and embarrassed about people's negative reactions to that in the first place Yes he's long been aware enough of himself and others to see he was beyond the pale and had to sort himself out a bit and he's well enough socialised to have been in two long relationships with women with eually strong personalities – now married to Sian Pattenden there's a name who's a blast from the past for ex Smash Hits readers of my generation But Haines is still a masterclass in not giving a fuck about what other people think and in the downsides of that much lauded tendency when it's taken too far As expected from Haines the book is unapologetically packed with specific British and musical cultural references and other random obscurities that will please those of us who get tired of bland UK publications written with an American export market in mind In a similar vein I sometimes suspect that if my first language wasn't English I wouldn't write English only Goodreads reviews If you know his milieu and the UK indie pop music scene of the last 2 or 3 decades and like surreal comedy and bizarre diatribes this would be a great read even if you're not specifically a fan of Luke Haines' musicHonestly I find a lot of the tastes here easy to relate to the idiosyncratic unevenness of loving some old things whilst having an energy that wants to sweep others away and see what will happen Mauling something whilst still kind of wanting to be a part of it Oh god that's how I talk about GR isn't it? His criticism of the theatre – whilst working on a musical – is spot on reeling off embarrassingly familiar subgenres like the references to the Clash by middle aged playwrights The plays about young people going to raves In 2004 The plays about teenage gangs The 'worried liberal' plays about the state of modern Britain Why would any fucker cough up 50 sovs to watch this of an evening when you can stand in your local Costcutter and get it for free? So yes the plays and the sense that everybody feels a bit betrayed by Tony Blair yet their utterly mindless worship of the holy church of theatre and their dogmatic belief in it will somehow cleanse themHe likes a lot of cool stuff but has no probs praising a bit of Status uo cos he likes it I've an inherent suspicion of people who don't seem to like even one thing that's popularly considered 'bad taste' And Haines' elegies for the music industry as we knew it are wonderful But he's too hard headed and fatalistic to wallow entirely He's one of those who can't seem to help getting up from the fray eventually and however tattered and torn trying again as if by reflex On the iconography of the past Following high praise of the Doors which I'm going to have to agree to disagree with in a 'they're okay' 35 star kinda way There’s a special place for blustering bad drunken poetry leather trousers and priapic shamans That place is called rock ’n’ roll In order for rock ’n’ roll to be fully accepted mythology must remain intact Then uite a while later cos he's not really the type to go on without a bitter joke for too long For 50 years the music biz shaped the backbone of popular culture – and provided a weirdly corrupt playpen for some lucky and unlucky boys and girls Fabulous artists fabulous chancers n’er do wells and n’er do nothings Genius idiot visionary moron saint and devil – all classes Johnny B Goode and Johnny Too Bad the wild the willing the innocent murderers and victims For 50 years all comers were welcome to try their hand But the music industry of old has gone now so don’t try to restore it The Golden Age of Rock ’n’ Roll 1955–2005 will in time be looked upon as a blip in history I was lucky enough to grab a last slice of the cake during the era of that blip Future generations will make their own luck I could not then say Raise a glass to the death of the music industry Let it bleed let it die good riddance I can't help think how a talented twenty year old now has it so much less easy than one in 1985 and get all hand wringy but if you've been done over by enough dodgy labels and managers I can see why you would say thatI liked Haines' two memoirs a lot – but can only ever give them 45 stars 4 seems wrong too using GR whole star system they're to me than most 4 star books I do enjoy a good rant especially if there's some laughs and probably deliberate exaggeration as many of my GR likes would show but when there's 250 odd pages not just 2500 words I miss there being of something that could be called heart or joy or simple enthusiasm Also Momus Jarvis Half Man Half Biscuit Morrissey I must have missed out one or two For various reasons I've not listened to much music for 25 yrs so even my knowledge of the old stuff I love is a tad rusty And I know a few people on here rate hip hop lyrics very highly


  2. says:

    I had to love this book since whenever I see my name in print I have an orgasm and I'm mentioned several times in this tome But fear not I also gave Luke's first book Bad Vibes a five star rating and I'm not mentioned once in that Bad Vibes is great and this is even better because it mentions me and tells it like it is about what a terrible album London Calling by The Clash is among others I don't see eye to eye with Luke about all his musical tastes or indeed the best way to make scrambled eggs but these are minor uibbles and overall Post Everything is a side splittingly funny insight into the world of rock and roll Were the pages of my copy of this book not so sticky I might make some detailed points but hey what do you really need to know?


  3. says:

    Mr Haines is on it again I actually bought it at his concert in the Southbank center in London Post Everything is a lovely unfounded non academic study of contemporary society I especially recommend the foreword to everyone If you think banksey is slightly overrated and Tate modern is rather something to be ashamed about here you'll find someone who tells you why and you'll never have to be uiet again on a diner party after someone asks you but why?


  4. says:

    This was a book I found all but impossible to disentangle from my own memories of the time it relates to I'm reading Luke Haines' two memoirs out of seuence because the local library happened to have the second one in stock when a post on Goodreads reminded me that they existed I'd heard him talking about the first volume years ago on Steve Lamac's Round Table and mentally filed it away on my ever growing 'to read' list I don't know that this mattered I know that the Auteurs were the under achievers of mid 90s British indie rock and that Luke Haines had a great talent for self sabotage strange though to think now that New Wave made all the 'best of' lists at the end of 1993 but a year later Now I'm a Cowboy which to my ears is both a accessible and a interesting record was nowhere to be seen Had he really made so many enemies so uickly?Anyway the book begins with a sort of stream of consciousness ramble post everything about the end of the period when pop music was actually a major part of British culture or at least I think that's the point he's trying to make over a period of time which pretty much coincided with when I stopped reading the weekly music press listening to the Evening Session on Radio 1 or arguing with strangers on the internet about the merits or otherwise of whatever was flavour of the week at wwwnmecom Looking back I thought I'd just outgrown it but reading Haines I wonder if it was alternative music itself that had backed itself into a corner and run out of ideas I'm sure there were people doing genuinely interesting things somewhere but it wasn't coming to my attention I struggled to see why the music press was getting excited about Razorlight or the bloody Libertines Maybe if I'd been ten years younger they would have been my bands or maybe I wouldn't have been interested in music at allThe book proper kicks off with the formation of Black Box Recorder described in the chapter heading as 'Chas Dave with a Chanteuse' the chapter headings are a part of the book's appeal 'The Rock and Roll Arthur Scargill' or a particular favourite of mine describing his encounter with self important vegetarian Chrissie Hynde 'Sausage Nuremburg' I was sort of familiar with Black Box Recorder as their second album and by Haines' account their best was amongst a pile of CDs my partner in crime at a by then doomed internet start up had left with me when he ran away to the other side of the world to get away from it all we were sort of trying to do Facebook six years too early and 'online community software' was never uite as snappy a term as 'social networking' The account of how successive record companies kept giving them 'development money' to go record and mix songs that they then wouldn't release and perhaps goes some way to explaining why the music industry ended up on its knees a few years laterInterspersed with this are a series of comic dwams in which Haines finds himself in conversation with a talking cat and with the dead rappers Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls about his solo project which he describes as a kind of white English hip hop concept album ' The Oliver Twist Manifesto' I confess I had to look this up on wikipedia as I'd half wondered if it was any real than Dirk Zweick's music industry bible Theorem of the Moron Thanks to Spotify I can confirm that it does exist and that it doesn't sound remotely like anything Tupac Shakur ever recordedI enjoyed the account of the three accidental pop stars' appearance on Top of The Pops when 'The Facts of Life' made the top 20 in 2001 indeed the re printed top 20 chart from that list was something of a Proustian Madeleine moment for me I'd forgotten how awful Craig David's 'Fill Me In' was or that for a time it was impossible to get away from Siso's 'Thong Song'As Haines points out in the book by then TotP meant far less than it once did killed off not so much by the internet as broadband was still not exactly widely available then but by the move from Thursday night to Friday which killed off its 'did you see?' watercoolerplayground discussion appealAfter the dissolution of Black Box Recorder Haines finds himself working to put together a musical about property magnate and latter day Rachman Nicholas Van Hoogstraaten It's another episode that had me wondering for a moment if it was a joke a parody of the sort of thing that might be expected to excite the kind of people who determine the programming at the National Theatre and on perhaps on some level it was but if so it was one that Haines' was able to keep a straight face about for long enough to get development money out of the NTOn one level this is the story of failure specifically the failure to sell many records I wonder if Sarah Nixey really did believe Haines when he told her he would make her a pop star But really its the exact opposite of that the story of a determined eccentric a real one off refusing to kowtow to the commercial pressures of the day ploughing his own furrow and making the records he wants to make And making a living out of it along the wayAt least I assume he does Perhaps he was independently wealthy all along and is burning through a vast inherited fortune there is as another reviewer pointed out 'none of that David Copperfield crap' in this book


  5. says:

    Shame he dies in the end


  6. says:

    The second and the best of the Luke Haines books And the first one is very enjoyable but this one seems tighter because I think the subject matter is much better The first one is about being in the music world during Brit Pop and this one is abouthim in his own world I highly recommend this book if you are a Black Box Recorder fan because it pretty much covers those years and his commentary like the first book is also much wittier Although his image is of a grouch I think he is actually a very good critic Which means I don't agree with him all the time but he knows how to say what's on his mind and he does it with great spirit Also the one problem I have with him music wise is his smarty pants teacher like attitude towards culture But alas in this book he gives credit to those who were there first And he has a really nice and interesting reading list at the back of the book including one of my faves Stewart Home And I am hoping that Mr Haines will return to empty page and fill it with some grief and good humor


  7. says:

    I like Haines because in my mind he is the last in the line of muscians artists writers who were painfully aware of 20th century art in all mediums filmmusicvisual artlit and didn't give a Fk about conforming to commercial pressures until when he wanted to facts of life and had a brief fling with chart success This book charts that period and although not as wonderful as the first book Haine's voice is snarky sharp and precise as alwaysLuke Haine's music is not for everyone and his writing might appear too cynical to some but in a way I'm glad that he remains an outsider free to keep working on whatever project takes his fancy Never a dull moment with Luke


  8. says:

    Another fantastic memoir from Haines a must for anyone with any interest in British music


  9. says:

    Really wonderful Not uite as cutting as Bad Vibes but still amazing


  10. says:

    Fantastic book on the second half of Luke Haines career If you've never heard of him please google his name he's a genius


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Post Everything

Review Post Everything

Britain in the late 1990s Post Britpop The dawn of the rock and roll apocalypse If it feels like there's nothing new under the sun that's because there is nothing new under the sun After the death of Kurt Cobain popular culture entered and is still in its final phase post everything Post Everything is the seuel to the hugely acclaimed Bad Vibes Britpop and My Part in its Downfall It is a story of survival in the music industry and the only way to survi I had to love this book since whenever I see my name in print I have an orgasm and I'm mentioned several times in this tome But fear not I also gave Luke's first book Bad Vibes a five star rating and I'm not mentioned once in that Bad Vibes is great and this is even better because it mentions me and tells it like it is about what a terrible album London Calling by The Clash is among others I don't see eye to eye with Luke about all his musical tastes or indeed the best way to make scrambled eggs but these are minor uibbles and overall Post Everything is a side splittingly funny insight into the world of rock and roll Were the pages of my copy of this book not so sticky I might make some detailed points but hey what do you really need to know? An American Diplomat in Franco Spain under the sun that's because there is nothing new Maya (Ridgeville, under the sun After the death of Kurt Cobain popular culture entered and is still in its final phase post everything Post Everything is the seuel to the hugely acclaimed Bad Vibes Britpop and My Part in its Downfall It is a story of survival in the music industry and the only way to survi I had to love this book since whenever I see my name in print I have an orgasm and I'm mentioned several times in this tome But fear not I also gave Luke's first book Bad Vibes a five star rating and I'm not mentioned once in that Bad Vibes is great and this is even better because it mentions me and tells it like it is about what a terrible album London Calling by The Clash is among others I don't see eye to eye with Luke about all his musical tastes or indeed the best way to make scrambled eggs but these are minor The Opposite Shore uibbles and overall Post Everything is a side splittingly funny insight into the world of rock and roll Were the pages of my copy of this book not so sticky I might make some detailed points but hey what do you really need to know?

Download Ø PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ¾ Luke Haines

Ve the tyrannical scourge of Britpop is to become an OutsiderWe open with Luke Haines the 'avant garde Arthur Scargill' calling upon the nation's pop stars to down tools and go on strike We get the story of Haines' post Britpop art house trio Black Box Recorder Chas and Dave with a chanteuse then barely pausing to put in a brief appearance on Top of the Pops we meet a talking cat two dead rappers Notorious BIG and Tupac Shakur a mystical England footba The second and the best of the Luke Haines books And the first one is very enjoyable but this one seems tighter because I think the subject matter is much better The first one is about being in the music world during Brit Pop and this one is abouthim in his own world I highly recommend this book if you are a Black Box Recorder fan because it pretty much covers those years and his commentary like the first book is also much wittier Although his image is of a grouch I think he is actually a very good critic Which means I don't agree with him all the time but he knows how to say what's on his mind and he does it with great spirit Also the one problem I have with him music wise is his smarty pants teacher like attitude towards culture But alas in this book he gives credit to those who were there first And he has a really nice and interesting reading list at the back of the book including one of my faves Stewart Home And I am hoping that Mr Haines will return to empty page and fill it with some grief and good humor Figment (Insanity, upon the nation's pop stars to down tools and go on strike We get the story of Haines' post Britpop art house trio Black Box Recorder Chas and Dave with a chanteuse then barely pausing to put in a brief appearance on Top of the Pops we meet a talking cat two dead rappers Notorious BIG and Tupac Shakur a mystical England footba The second and the best of the Luke Haines books And the first one is very enjoyable but this one seems tighter because I think the subject matter is much better The first one is about being in the music world during Brit Pop and this one is abouthim in his own world I highly recommend this book if you are a Black Box Recorder fan because it pretty much covers those years and his commentary like the first book is also much wittier Although his image is of a grouch I think he is actually a very good critic Which means I don't agree with him all the time but he knows how to say what's on his mind and he does it with great spirit Also the one problem I have with him music wise is his smarty pants teacher like attitude towards culture But alas in this book he gives credit to those who were there first And he has a really nice and interesting reading list at the back of the book including one of my faves Stewart Home And I am hoping that Mr Haines will return to empty page and fill it with some grief and good humor

Luke Haines ¾ 6 Review

Ll manager and a shady transgender German Professor exponent of a dangerous and radical 'Beatles denial' cult and author of The Theorem of the Moron the most important book about rock that you've never heard of Haines even finds time to write a musical for the National TheatreBlisteringly funny and searingly scathing Post Everything may uite possibly be the first and only truly surreal comic rock memoir It even contains a killer recipe for scrambled eg I like Haines because in my mind he is the last in the line of muscians artists writers who were painfully aware of 20th century art in all mediums filmmusicvisual artlit and didn't give a Fk about conforming to commercial pressures until when he wanted to facts of life and had a brief fling with chart success This book charts that period and although not as wonderful as the first book Haine's voice is snarky sharp and precise as alwaysLuke Haine's music is not for everyone and his writing might appear too cynical to some but in a way I'm glad that he remains an outsider free to keep working on whatever project takes his fancy Never a dull moment with Luke