Review ´ The Warriors Reflections on Men in Battle ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub



10 thoughts on “The Warriors Reflections on Men in Battle

  1. says:

    I had never heard of this book before but it was a great study of men in combat J Glenn Gray was drafted on the same day he received his PhD in philosophy from Columbia University in May 1941 He was discharged as a 2nd Lieutenant in October 1945 Fourteen years later Gray reread his war journals in an attempt to find some meaning in his wartime experiences He wrote this book a philosophical meditation on what warfare does to us and why soldiers act as they do By the end he notes War reveals dimensions of human nature both above and below the acceptable standards for humanity His second chapter is called The Enduring Appeals of Battle Already I'm thinking This is a man who gets it and isn't afraid to say it We can hide our heads in the sand and not appreciate why we have war or we can look at it head on For many men war is what Dixon Wecter has called the one great lyric passage in their lives Gray lists the three appeals of war the delight in seeing the delight in comradeship and the delight in destruction Fighters may know one or of these appeals or some others that Gray is not aware of If I were to add one to Gray's list it would be the delight in feeling alive I have never been alive than when I knew I could die at any moment The delight in seeing is probably the least understood It is that rubberneck urge to see what is happening Perhaps it is the Aristotelian idea of a catharsis If we experience it and escape alive we now know and go out and tell others We need to see the unusual and not just the everyday War is beautiful I have a line like that in one of my poems I was surprised at the great beauty of it all It is wrong to believe that only beauty can give us aesthetic delight; the ugly can please us too Every artist knows this In addition to the disorder war has color and movement variety panoramic sweep and sometimes even momentary proportion and harmony As Robert E Lee was reputed to have said It is well that war is so terrible we would grow too fond of it The next point I have to uote verbatim Happiness is doubtless the wrong word for the satisfaction that men experience when they are possessed by the lust to destroy and to kill their kind Most men would never admit that they enjoy killing and there are a great many who do not On the other hand thousands of youths who never suspected the presence of such an impulse in themselves have learned in military life the mad excitement of destroying Hemingway said in For Whom the Bell Tolls Stop making dubious literature and admit that you have liked to kill as all who are soldiers by choice have enjoyed it at some time whether they lie about it or not Chapter 3 is called Love War's Ally and Foe Again right on the money and not afraid to say so The Greeks understood when Aphrodite mated with Ares Gray describes a moment when he went through a cave in Italy where there was no sanitation A woman grabbed his hand in a move that was unmistakably amorous Soldiers tend to concentrate on sex and women Perhaps their most common word is fuck Many soldiers seemed unable to utter a sentence without using it at least once Just invoking the word seems enough Legal brothels have often been provided for soldiers throughout history Prostitution and soldiers seem to go hand in hand A WWII expression Soldiers want three things Get drunk get laid and get home But I also saw love between soldiers and the girls they coupled up with in Vietnam The darkest side of this is of course the rape that goes on We see sex slaves in the Mideast today My girlfriend in Vietnam had been sold to a soldier and raped in a locked room when she was younger Women also bring a gentleness and affection needed by men in wartime All soldiers will remember some connection to their wartime experiences Many times the soldiers and their loved ones did not even understand each other's language The inability to communicate only heightened the joy of discovery for them It is surprising that the French did not understand why French women found lovers with the German soldiers These women were shamed publicly Chapter 4 is The Soldier's Relations to Death Death in combat is a reality We know it is out there coming at us Outside of combat we plan for a long future No one appreciates life as he who is about to die or could possibly die When you think you can live forever you lose sight of the value of this moment Death becomes something that happens to someone else especially for the young Soldiers fall and die in such contorted and unnatural positions as a rule that even their comrades find it hard to believe that shortly before they were alive This is part of the mystery of death those who enter its realm are uickly far removed from the living In one story fleeing Germans steal horses But when they are killed no one is able to look at the horses without shuddering Death came through with such clarity when looking at the eyes of the horses In the war poems of Rupert Brooke death is longed for as the only possibility of giving life authenticity and creative power All creation is a kind of dying Combat soldiers become almost dedicated to death Soldiers can find a meaning in their wartime experiences not available at home Chapter 5 is Images of the Enemy Even in this WWII book armed warfare was becoming where civilians were being killed from a distance with planes and cannons Military ethics were disappearing We begin to reach the conclusion Any act that helps my side win the war is right and good and any act that hinders it is wrong and bad We learn Never give your enemy a chance Restraints fall We are conditioned to hate the enemy They become easier to kill A civilian removed from the battlefield may be bloodthirsty than the front line soldier Many WWII soldiers were appalled to receive letters from home wanting to know how many kills they had The front line soldier takes prisoners and knows a human being who wants to live Gray describes a scene where prisoners hum a tune and everyone joins in Reminiscent of the perhaps the greatest ending to a war movie of all time the ending of Paths of Glory directed by Stanley Kubrick A must see war film But when a soldier loses a friend his anger turns to absolute hatred and a desire to exterminate every last one of the enemy The German general Rommel always treated his prisoners as comrades in arms Sometimes the enemy is seen as sub human Officers may even train their soldiers in hatred Chapter 6 is The Ache of Guilt In WWII the number of civilians who lost their lives exceeded the number of soldiers killed in combat Combat soldiers often fail to support their comrades in warfare at a critical moment either by a sin of omission or commission Sometimes officers can expose their men to needless destruction Add to this the unnumbered acts of injustice so omnipresent in warfare How could any soldier be free of care after all of that? The fact is that a great number of veterans are able to free themselves of responsibility And our former enemies often show little regret or repentance Gray says Americans in Germany after WWII for instance feel aggrieved that the German populace does not feel responsibility for having visited Hitler upon the world Germans for their part resent the fact that few Americans appear to regret the bombing of German cities into rubble and the burning and crushing of helpless women and children We tend to point a finger and ignore our own faults Gray speaks of listening to Fascist and Nazi police and party functionaries saying My conscience is clear I have done nothing wrong And I was just carrying out orders It reminds me of police on trial today saying I felt my life was in danger Say it no matter what Gray tells a story of a German soldier who refused to fire in an execution suad He was then lined up and killed by his comrades Guilt often comes gradually Older soldiers often feel the pain There is no escaping the uniform you wear Many American soldiers felt shock and shame at the nuclear bombs in Japan Men of conscience know that the people there are not guilty of war Collective guilt can overtake a country as it did in Germany The final chapter is The Future of War As a young man Gray secretly wished for a war he could participate in That desire is in others Thus war will go on And may I say from experience life after war can seem boring The intensity of life during war knows no eual


  2. says:

    The very best thing I have read on the attractions of war come from this book Gray fought in WWII survived went to graduate school in philosophy and decided to write a book I suspect that Chris Hedges War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning performs a similar function In the Western canon this line of thinking comes from Hegel See especially DP Verene's chapter Hegel's Account of War in Hegel's Political Philosophy Problems Perspectives edited by Z A Pelczynski Hegel argues that war will never end so long as the warrior continues to be a viable human identity What Hegel Hedges and Gray ask is what ualities in the identity of a warrior attract us? What aspects of war draw our ethical yes ethical desires? To answer these uestions Gray has chapters on the following the aesthetic spectacle of War the creation of camaraderie and the opportunity to sacrifice one's life for a larger purposeTo treat war as a regrettable aspect of the human condition to treat it merely as a part of us that has gone wrong is 1 to not take war seriously 2 therefore to offer palliatives for deep social wounds and 3 to perpetuate the hidden culture that secretly and not so secretly valorizes war What Hegel Hedges and Gray do instead is to admit and face head on how war attracts us galvanizes us and gives our lives substantial meaning Then and only then do they begin to offer a diagnosisThe writing is beautiful but one must labor through this book because initially the terrain seems so foreign If we accept the familiarity of this new country then we return to it again and again


  3. says:

    An excellent read if you are in any way interested about the psychology of soldiers in war Gray had a PhD in philosophy when he was enlisted as a private in WWII and this book is a work of both psychology and philosophy He discusses WWII and the soldiers in it frankly openly and objectively as possible; none of the good war bullshit For the time he was writing in the 50s some of his conclusions are surprising and prescient As a veteran myself Gray gave a specific and clear voice to many things I could only vaguely identify about my own Ira experience I checked this out from the library but will be buying a copy to flip through again


  4. says:

    I had read this book as a textbook while an undergraduate but it was wasted on me then It was just words Now as a slightly mature adult in my 50s who has served in Bosnia and a couple of times in Afghanistan it had resonance I re read it over Memorial Day weekendI was struck by a couple of things The first was the depth and complexity of his entries in his war journal Amazing that he had the time and discipline to keep up with itAnother was that soldiers are fundamentally unchanged Despite circumstances that could not have been different than the type of total war he experienced many of his observations ring true today On the other hand I was struck by the callous disregard for human life that he was exposed to daily and thought how different that was from the way war is fought now at least by the USA I think he'd have been amazed at the amount of effort spent on minimizing collateral death when striking a target and the idea that the population IS the target at least kinetically is long gone We also take measures at great cost in money and logistical support to protect our soldiers like dedicated support from heavy bombers for a small tactical unit that reflect the shift from draftee soldiers being expendable cogs in an industrial war machine to precious professional assets that are spent sparinglyI didn't agree with everything in this book and I daresay several veterans of WWII would disagree with some bits too But his observations and conclusions are a product of his experience and perceptions of war or life for the poor civilians who happen to live there in a combat zone are different for every person there The lens through which experiences are viewed is also different based on culture education and personality Ultimately I agreed a lot than I disagreed with his conclusions and I understand his viewpoint even when I disagreedThere's so much This is a relatively short book But it will stay in your thoughts long after you finish it


  5. says:

    The late Mr Gray 1913 1977 offers a uniue perspective on the effects of war for soldiers The book was published in 1959 and is about his experiences during World War II He had just received his doctorate in philosophy when he was drafted and saw campaigns in France North Africa Italy and Germany The author’s book is not a memoir as much as an analysis of the effects war has on soldiers and civilians Don’t kid yourself war leaves lasting psychological scars on all soldiers even on Tom Brokaw’s “Greatest Generation” The author portrayal of soldiers and civilians is consistent with the other works I’ve read on the subject all the way back to the Civil War and up to today’s engagements Mr Gray used a handful of his short journal entries during World War II as examples of what occurred on a psychological and sociological level The extreme surreal environment forces men into actions that are sometimes primal or contradictory to their personality that they display in peaceful times Soldiers can one moment be compassionate individuals then uickly display the most abhorrent behavior never dreaming they had such ugly sides in themselves ‘The Warriors’ is a 260 page condensed book but filled with acute observations on each page Its incisiveness reminded me of the 1951 Eric Hoffer book ‘The True Believer Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements’ Mr Gray covers such issues as the spectacle and aesthetic satisfaction of battle; comradeship; the delight in destruction; how love manifests itself in soldiers; their relationship to death being so near and arbitrary; the struggle between courage and cowardice; how soldiers envision the enemy; and how guilt factors into a soldier’s psyche Much of the book deals in philosophical speculation by the learned author All the issues addressed are multifaceted and understandable even the abhorrent ones It is not a cynical book My only disappointment with ‘The Warriors’ was the last chapter “The Future of War” Much has transpired since the book was published in 1959 and what the author states about efforts to avoid future wars seem simplistic and pollyannaish It’s easy to be judgmental of a soldier’s actions when a person is sitting comfortably far away from any potential harm I’m sixty years old and have never served in the military If I’m honest with myself there’s no way I could really know how I’d act in such hellish circumstances unless I was in the thick of it No one knows What Mr Gray did so well in ‘The Warriors’ is explain the multitude of ways a human may react during war It is dealing in many shades of gray and not black and white issues He’s seen them all up close and many of them personal War is the “gift” that keeps on pummeling the survivors long after the victims have been devoured by worms ‘The Warriors’ reuires a little concentration than a straightforward memoir but I thought it was well worth the effort Mr Gray’s book will linger in my thoughts for a long time to come


  6. says:

    Poignant and revealing about the soldier's experience before during and after warfare Very helpful for writing in a soldier's POV in fact I'm just reading short selections but I bought it to keep on hand for moments when I'm struggling to get into my character's head


  7. says:

    Gray a WWII veteran reflects on the experience and psychology on this thoughtful if somewhat hit or miss book Clay weaves diary entries and letters into his argument and he presents really profound and compelling experiences through these sources This is one of the first major works of combat psychology although it is really of a philosophy book because there's not much genuine psychology in hereThere were a number of points in this book I thought were fascinating One was the difference between comrades and friends Gray argues that most people are capable of forming comradely relations because this is essentially bonding over a specific purpose and necessity Comradeship reduces the individual into the group making him capable of fighting and surviving In contrast he argues that most people struggle to create friendship because friendship maintains or even enhances the individual personality in its connection to others It reuires a much stronger sense of self Those who can't create friendship will often miss wartime terribly because comradeship was the closest they ever got to deep connections with other peopleMost of Gray's points rely on inherent logic anecdotal evidence and his own experience rather than systematic evidence He's deeply a part of mid 20th century social psychology and you can see the influence of Freud Hoffer and Fromm on his work In other words a lot of his points just hang in the air without much evidence to back them up as do the work of these other psycho philosphers For example I don't really buy Gray's conclusion about what it will take to end war He finds the origins of war in the appeal of war as a spectacle and meaningful collective and individual experience to those who lack meaning in their own lives He argues uoting Nietzsche that people need to morally decide to prefer vulnerability to other rather than being hated or feared in order to destroy war He also contends that people who get meaning out of human relationships will no longer find war appealing family work art etc will not find war appealing I think this argument completely ignores the geopolitical factors that cause war Moreover it also ignores the fact that people will fight to protect the meaningful aspects of his life There is a strong argument to make that people are becoming anti war and that war is less freuent today but I don't think Gray has found it Still as a preliminary exploration of the soldier's social and psychological experience of war this is an important and interesting book


  8. says:

    I read this ages ago in college and found it even moving when I reread it recently Gray essentially makes the same argument that Simone Weil does in her famous essay The Iliad or The Poem of Force Where Weil states that force turns combatants into things stone Gray says Man as warrior is only partly a man yet fatefully enough this aspect of him is capable of transforming the wholeIn describing the abstract Weil's style has the power of near poetic epigram whereas Gray's style is somewhat academic However Gray also weaves in many personal reflections in the form of actual diary entries from his experience in WWII This has the effect of creating an immediacy and human connection sometimes lacking in Weil's essayAnd in the end I think Gray is hopeful than Weil of one's ability to recover one's humanity in the wake of war Atonement will become for him not an act of faith or a deed but a life a life devoted to strengthening the bonds between men and between man and natureGray and Weil complement each other uite effectively but if I had to recommend one over the other I'd probably pick Gray because of the personal element in his book and because Weil's is at heart a critical reading of a literary work the Iliad


  9. says:

    This book is outstanding It is rare for soldiers to have the capacity to reflect so deeply on their experience in war Most lack the tools the insight or the inclination The resultant impact on identity is so overwhelming that it fells everything leaving no room much for reflection Gray's Doctorate in Philosophy no doubt provided a framework for him that most others lack and he kept a detailed diary to help the process when eventually when time had passed he was able to undertake the task His experience is common to one degree or another to all combat soldiers and that experience is like no other He touches on many very important concepts his analysis and deeply felt response have been so helpful to me in understanding my own Any mental health professional dealing with returning veterans should be reuired to read this book most never will 's the pity As a result most will be a part of the problem than the solution


  10. says:

    Part essay part memoir this spare elegant book on the psychology of war will stay with me for a long time Perhaps because the author has his doctorate in philosophy I found his uest to describe the reasons why we go to war how the soldier views war and ultimately how war defines each soldier's uest for humanity hauntingly beautiful and heartbreaking My favorite parts of the book were sections of his own personal journal during his time at a soldier in World War II


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The Warriors Reflections on Men in Battle

Summary The Warriors Reflections on Men in Battle

Mination of the reasons soldiers act as they do Gray explains the attractions of battle the adrenaline rush the esprit de corps and analyzes the many rationalizations made by combat troops to justify their actions In the end Gray notes “War reveals dimensions of human nature both above and below the acceptable standards for humanity?. This book is outstanding It is rare for soldiers to have the capacity to reflect so deeply on their experience in war Most lack the tools the insight or the inclination The resultant impact on identity is so overwhelming that it fells everything leaving no room much for reflection Gray's Doctorate in Philosophy no doubt provided a framework for him that most others lack and he kept a detailed diary to help the process when eventually when time had passed he was able to undertake the task His experience is common to one degree or another to all combat soldiers and that experience is like no other He touches on many very important concepts his analysis and deeply felt response have been so helpful to me in understanding my own Any mental health professional dealing with returning veterans should be reuired to read this book most never will 's the pity As a result most will be a part of the problem than the solution Droit musulman : du statut personnel et des successions d'après les différents rites, (Éd.1895) provided a framework for him that most others lack and he kept a detailed diary to help the Droit musulman - Des successions: D'après les différents rites, et plus particulièrement d'après le rite hanafite process when eventually when time had Ramadan rariq - Les musulmans dans la laïcité responsabilités et droits des musulmans dans les sociétés occidentales deuxième édition passed he was able to undertake the task His experience is common to one degree or another to all combat soldiers and that experience is like no other He touches on many very important concepts his analysis and deeply felt response have been so helpful to me in understanding my own Any mental health Contingency in a Sacred Law: Legal and Ethical Norms in the Muslim Fiqh professional dealing with returning veterans should be reuired to read this book most never will 's the Fondamentalismes, intégrismes : Une menace pour les droits de l'homme pity As a result most will be a Etude Sur La Theorie Du Droit Musulman, Volume 1 - Primary Source Edition part of the Le contrat d'entreprise en droit arabe: cas de l'Égypte: avec les dispositions des principaux codes arabes en différentes langues problem than the solution

Free read ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub · J. Glenn Gray

Selected for the 2019 Commandant's Professional Reading List J Glenn Gray entered the army as a private in May 1941 having been drafted on the same day he was informed of his doctorate in philosophy from Columbia University He was discharged as a second lieutenant in October 1945 having been awarded a battlefield commission during fight. The very best thing I have read on the attractions of war come from this book Gray fought in WWII survived went to graduate school in philosophy and decided to write a book I suspect that Chris Hedges War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning performs a similar function In the Western canon this line of thinking comes from Hegel See especially DP Verene's chapter Hegel's Account of War in Hegel's Political Philosophy Problems Perspectives edited by Z A Pelczynski Hegel argues that war will never end so long as the warrior continues to be a viable human identity What Hegel Hedges and Gray ask is what ualities in the identity of a warrior attract us What aspects of war draw our ethical yes ethical desires To answer these uestions Gray has chapters on the following the aesthetic spectacle of War the creation of camaraderie and the opportunity to sacrifice one's life for a larger purposeTo treat war as a regrettable aspect of the human condition to treat it merely as a part of us that has gone wrong is 1 to not take war seriously 2 therefore to offer palliatives for deep social wounds and 3 to perpetuate the hidden culture that secretly and not so secretly valorizes war What Hegel Hedges and Gray do instead is to admit and face head on how war attracts us galvanizes us and gives our lives substantial meaning Then and only then do they begin to offer a diagnosisThe writing is beautiful but one must labor through this book because initially the terrain seems so foreign If we accept the familiarity of this new country then we return to it again and again Observance des Droits de Dieu (l') private in May 1941 having been drafted on the same day he was informed of his doctorate in L'Empire ottoman et l'Europe (TEMPUS t. 697) philosophy from Columbia University He was discharged as a second lieutenant in October 1945 having been awarded a battlefield commission during fight. The very best thing I have read on the attractions of war come from this book Gray fought in WWII survived went to graduate school in La Mecque : Des origines à nos jours philosophy and decided to write a book I suspect that Chris Hedges War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning L'Islam pour les Nuls poche performs a similar function In the Western canon this line of thinking comes from Hegel See especially DP Verene's chapter Hegel's Account of War in Hegel's Political Philosophy Problems Perspectives edited by Z A Pelczynski Hegel argues that war will never end so long as the warrior continues to be a viable human identity What Hegel Hedges and Gray ask is what ualities in the identity of a warrior attract us What aspects of war draw our ethical yes ethical desires To answer these uestions Gray has chapters on the following the aesthetic spectacle of War the creation of camaraderie and the opportunity to sacrifice one's life for a larger Histoire du Proche-Orient contemporain (Repères t. 654) purposeTo treat war as a regrettable aspect of the human condition to treat it merely as a Dr. Saoud et Mr. Djihad (Le monde comme il va) part of us that has gone wrong is 1 to not take war seriously 2 therefore to offer O Jérusalem palliatives for deep social wounds and 3 to AMNESIQUES perpetuate the hidden culture that secretly and not so secretly valorizes war What Hegel Hedges and Gray do instead is to admit and face head on how war attracts us galvanizes us and gives our lives substantial meaning Then and only then do they begin to offer a diagnosisThe writing is beautiful but one must labor through this book because initially the terrain seems so foreign If we accept the familiarity of this new country then we return to it again and again

J. Glenn Gray · 9 Read

Ing in France Gray saw service in North Africa Italy France and Germany in a counter espionage unit Fourteen years after his discharge Gray began to reread his war journals and letters in an attempt to find some meaning in his wartime experiences The result is The Warriors a philosophical meditation on what warfare does to us and an exa. The late Mr Gray 1913 1977 offers a uniue perspective on the effects of war for soldiers The book was published in 1959 and is about his experiences during World War II He had just received his doctorate in philosophy when he was drafted and saw campaigns in France North Africa Italy and Germany The author’s book is not a memoir as much as an analysis of the effects war has on soldiers and civilians Don’t kid yourself war leaves lasting psychological scars on all soldiers even on Tom Brokaw’s “Greatest Generation” The author portrayal of soldiers and civilians is consistent with the other works I’ve read on the subject all the way back to the Civil War and up to today’s engagements Mr Gray used a handful of his short journal entries during World War II as examples of what occurred on a psychological and sociological level The extreme surreal environment forces men into actions that are sometimes primal or contradictory to their personality that they display in peaceful times Soldiers can one moment be compassionate individuals then uickly display the most abhorrent behavior never dreaming they had such ugly sides in themselves ‘The Warriors’ is a 260 page condensed book but filled with acute observations on each page Its incisiveness reminded me of the 1951 Eric Hoffer book ‘The True Believer Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements’ Mr Gray covers such issues as the spectacle and aesthetic satisfaction of battle; comradeship; the delight in destruction; how love manifests itself in soldiers; their relationship to death being so near and arbitrary; the struggle between courage and cowardice; how soldiers envision the enemy; and how guilt factors into a soldier’s psyche Much of the book deals in philosophical speculation by the learned author All the issues addressed are multifaceted and understandable even the abhorrent ones It is not a cynical book My only disappointment with ‘The Warriors’ was the last chapter “The Future of War” Much has transpired since the book was published in 1959 and what the author states about efforts to avoid future wars seem simplistic and pollyannaish It’s easy to be judgmental of a soldier’s actions when a person is sitting comfortably far away from any potential harm I’m sixty years old and have never served in the military If I’m honest with myself there’s no way I could really know how I’d act in such hellish circumstances unless I was in the thick of it No one knows What Mr Gray did so well in ‘The Warriors’ is explain the multitude of ways a human may react during war It is dealing in many shades of gray and not black and white issues He’s seen them all up close and many of them personal War is the “gift” that keeps on pummeling the survivors long after the victims have been devoured by worms ‘The Warriors’ reuires a little concentration than a straightforward memoir but I thought it was well worth the effort Mr Gray’s book will linger in my thoughts for a long time to come